Cover image for Where you belong
Title:
Where you belong
Author:
Bradford, Barbara Taylor, 1933-
Edition:
Unabridged.
Publication Information:
Prince Frederick, MD : Recorded Books, LLC, [2000]

℗2000
Physical Description:
10 audio discs (12 hrs.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780788751592
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Anna M. Reinstein Library XX(1103899.9) Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

After a childhood of parental neglect, Valentine Denning has finally found happiness through her career as a war photojournalist & through the love of fellow photographer Tony Hampton. But when Tony is tragically cut down in Kosovo, Val learns that her relationship with him was not what she was led to believe


Author Notes

Barbara Taylor Bradford was born in Upper Armley, Leeds, in Yorkshire on May 10, 1933. At the age of fifteen, she was working as a typist for the Yorkshire Evening Post. After six months, she was promoted to cub reporter in the newsroom. At eighteen, she became the newspaper's Woman's Page Editor and at twenty, she headed for London where she became Fashion Editor of the magazine Woman's Own. She also reported for the London Evening News, Today Magazine and other publications, covering everything from crime to show business. In 1961, she met her future husband Robert Bradford and they were married in 1963. After they married, they moved to the United States and she began writing a syndicated column, Designing Woman. The column was published for twelve years and received several awards.

Her debut novel, A Woman of Substance, was published in 1979 and she has since written over 20 novels. Many of her novels have been made into television mini-series including A Woman of Substance, Voice of the Heart, Act of Will, Everything to Gain and A Secret Affair. She also wrote children's books and eight books on decorating.

She has received numerous awards for her work including the Matrix Award from New York Women in Communication Inc in 1985, the City of Hope's Spirit of Life Award in 1995, the Five Towns Music and Art Foundation's Award of Achievement for outstanding accomplishments in the field of Literature in 1997 and the British Excellence Award in 1998. She was inducted into the Matrix Hall of Fame in 1998 and into the Writers Hall of Fame of America in 2003. In 2007, she was awarded an OBE (The Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II for her contributions to Literature. She is a member of the James Madison Council of the Library of Congress. She is also involved in several charity projects such as Literacy Partners and the Police Athletic League of New York City. She made the New York Times Best Seller List in 2014 with her title Cavendon Hall.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Bradford's latest opens with a bang. Valentine Denning is a 31-year-old American photographer assigned the grueling task of shooting the leaders of the K.L.A. on the frontlines of the Serbian War. Working alongside her are fellow photographers and "comrades-in-arms" Jake and Tony, her lover of one year. Before the reader has a chance to know Tony, he is killed in a surprise ambush. Val and Jake are both injured, and after a brief hospital stay, they fly to Paris where physical and emotional healing begins. Dismayed by the revelations that their old friend Tony wasn't who he seemed to be, Val and Jake are drawn even closer together. They soon launch a romance that takes them from Paris to southern France and then to New York, where a bitter Val confronts another demon, her cold fish of a mother. Bradford does a sumptuous job describing the French scenery and the extravagant meals Val and Jake are always preparing, but she falls short of bringing her characters to life. Yes, Val does come across as an admirable, tough heroine who, in her quest for self-fulfillment, does not always get it quite right. But in Bradford's attempt to connect her to a large cast of characters--from Tony's widow to Val's boss to a servant's battered daughter--she loses track of what makes her main character tick. Val is kept too busy trying to deal with major human dramas in too short a period of time, and her relationships ultimately come across as shallow. --Kristin Kloberdanz


Publisher's Weekly Review

Injecting her new novel with timeliness, bestselling Bradford (A Sudden Change of Heart) makes her setting war-zone Kosovo, where gorgeous and talented photojournalist Valentine Denning is covering the action with two equally gorgeous men: American Jake Newberg and Val's lover, Brit Tony Hampton. All three are caught in an ambush on the ground, and Tony dies. Val doesn't even have time to grieve for her boyfriend before she discovers Tony lied to her: he was already married. Attempting to cheer Val, Jake takes her to a beautiful villa in Cap-Ferrat, and predictably, the heroine decides that he is really the one for her. The world intrudes on their idyll when they help Fran‡oise, the caretakers' daughter, to escape from her abusive husband. Meanwhile, Val is pestered by calls from Donald, the younger brother she resents because their mother lavished attention on him while ignoring her. Jake and Val jet back to New York, excited about a book project they've thought up, and knowing that Val has to face her family demons. There, Val is devastated when her mother finally reveals the secret of her lack of maternal feeling, and they tangle over who will take over the family cosmetics company. Val and Jake are separated when he goes back to Kosovo, but handsome artist Alexander St. Just Stevens adds intrigue to Val's lonely life. Despite a lively story line and a suspenseful buildup to various revelations, the narrative is formulaic and predictable; each new development is obvious. While this novel will probably satisfy Bradford's more loyal fans, it may not generate excitement for new readers. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Valentine Denning, an American photojournalist covering the war in Kosovo, sees her friend and lover, Tony Hampton, shot in an ambush. Trying to drag him to safety, she also is wounded, and upon waking up in a Belgrade hospital, she learns of Tony's death. Grief-stricken, she attends his funeral, only to meet his widow and learn he was never divorced. Val, disillusioned and in pain, returns to New York City to recover and try to contemplate the future. A prolific writer, Bradford (A Sudden Change of Heart) has been a best-selling author of adventure-romance novels for over 20 years. This book, however, does not live up to expectations. After an exciting opening, the story declines into a confusing tangle of subplots going nowhere, with tiresome, pedestrian dialog. Near the end, Bradford introduces a new love interest, a world-famous painter, then drops the whole thread, leaving the listener wondering why she included this "almost relationship" at all. These dead ends occur throughout. Alexandra O'Karma reads smoothly and handles the French accents well, although often the voices of the characters sound the same. Tape quality is excellent; recommended with reservations for popular fiction collections. Nancy R. Ives, SUNY at Geneseo (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Kosovo, August 1998 The three of us sat in a small copse situated at the far end of the village, taking shelter from the blistering heat. It was bosky and cool on this scorching summer's day. The jeep was parked out on the road nearby, and I peered toward it, frowning slightly, wondering what had happened to Ajet, our adviser, guide, and driver. He had gone on foot to the village, having several days before arranged to meet an old school friend there, who in turn would take us to see the leaders of the K.L.A. According to Ajet, the Kosovo Liberation Army had their main training camp in the vicinity of the village, and Ajet had assured us in Pec, and then again on the drive here, that the leaders would be in the camp, and that they would be more than willing to have their photographs taken for transmission to newspapers and magazines around the world. "Everyone should know the truth, should know about our cause, our just and rightful cause," Ajet had said to us time and again. When he had left the copse ages ago, he had been smiling cheerfully, happy at the idea of meeting his old friend, and I had watched him step out jauntily as he walked down the dusty road in a determined and purposeful manner. But that had been over three hours ago, and he had still not returned, and this disturbed me. I could not help wondering if something unforeseen, something bad, had happened to the friendly young Kosovar who had been so helpful to us. I rose and walked through the trees, shading my eyes with my hand and looking down the dirt road. There was no sign of Ajet, and, in fact, there was very little activity at all. But I waited for a short while longer, hoping he would appear at any moment. My name is Valentine Denning, and I'm a New Yorker born and bred, but now I base myself in Paris, where I work as a photojournalist for Gemstar, a well-known international news-photo agency. With the exception of my grandfather, no one in my family ever thought I would become a photojournalist. When I was a child, Grandfather had spotted my desire to record everything I saw and bought me my first camera. My parents never paid much attention to me, and what I would do when I grew up never seemed to cross their minds. My brother Donald, to whom I was much closer in those days and tended to bully since he was younger, was forever after me to become a model, a job that held no attraction for me whatsoever. Donald kept pointing out that I was tall and slim, with long legs and an athletic build, as if I didn't know my own body. I know I'm not pretty enough, but at least I don't look too bad in the pictures Jake and Tony have taken of me. But I'm not much into clothes; I like T-shirts, khaki pants, white cotton shirts, and bush jackets, workmanlike clothes that are perfect for the life I lead. I'm thirty-one years old, constantly traveling, living out of a suitcase, and then there are the crazy hours, the lack of comfort, even of the most basic of amenities, when I'm on the front lines covering wars and other disasters, not to mention the danger I often find myself facing. But I prefer this life to walking down a catwalk, showing off Paris couture. Turning away from the road at last, I went back through the trees to rejoin Jake Newberg and Tony Hampton, comrades-in-arms, as Tony calls us. I think of these two men as my family; we've worked together for several years now and we're inseparable. Jake is my best friend, and Tony has graduated from best friend to lover in the past year. The three of us go everywhere together, and we always make sure we are on the same assignments for our news-photo agencies. I gazed at Tony surreptitiously for a moment, thinking how fit and healthy he looked as he sat on part of a felled tree trunk, loading two of his cameras with rolls of new film. Tony, who is British, is ten years older than me. Stocky and muscular, he inherited his mother's Black Irish good looks, and he is a handsome and charismatic man. But it's his masculinity, his potent sexuality, that women find most appealing, even overwhelming, and certainly irresistible, as I have discovered. Considered to be one of the world's great war photographers, of the same ilk as the late Robert Capa, he is something of a risk taker when it comes to getting his pictures. This does not unduly worry me, although I know it gives Jake Newberg cause for concern; he has discussed it with me frequently of late. I eyed Jake, sitting on the grass with his back to a tree, looking nonchalant as he made notes in the small blue leather notebook he always carries with him. Jake is also an American, "a Jew from Georgia" is the way he likes to describe himself. At thirty-eight, he is also one of the top war photographers, a prizewinner like Tony. I've won many awards myself but I've never attempted to put myself in their league, although Tony and Jake say I belong there, that I'm just as good as they are. Jake is tall, lean, with a physical toughness about him that makes him seem indestructible; anyway, that is the way I view him. He's an attractive man with an expressive face, blondish curly hair, and the most vivid blue eyes I've ever seen. Yet despite his puckishness and the mischievous twinkle that often glints in those eyes, I long ago discovered that Jake is the most compassionate of men. And I've come to appreciate his understanding of the complexities of the human heart and the human frailties we are all afflicted with. Tony glanced up as he became aware of me hovering over him. "What is it?" he asked, frowning slightly. "Is something wrong?" "I hope Ajet's all right, Tony, he's been gone--" "I'm sure he is," Tony cut in quickly with a certain firmness, and then he gave me a reassuring smile. "It's very quiet, peaceful out there, isn't it?" I nodded. "There's hardly any sign of life." "Doesn't surprise me. I think the village is probably half deserted by now. It's more than likely that a lot of locals have already left, are moving south ahead of the Serbian army, crossing the border into Albania as fast as they can." "You're probably right." I sat down on the grass and fell silent, ruminating. Jake glanced at me and then pinned his eyes thoughtfully on Tony. He said in a brisk tone, "Let's abandon this shoot, get the hell out of here, Tony. I've suddenly got a bad feeling." "But we won't get this chance again," I felt bound to point out, sitting up straighter, staring at Jake. Before either man could address my comment, Ajet suddenly reappeared. He came wandering in from the road looking as if he had no cares in the world. Not only did he seem unperturbed, he actually looked pleased with himself, almost smug. From the Paperback edition. Excerpted from Where You Belong by Barbara Taylor Bradford All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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