Cover image for Law and order and school : daily life in an educational program for juvenile delinquents
Title:
Law and order and school : daily life in an educational program for juvenile delinquents
Author:
Birnbaum, Shira, 1962-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
ix, 197 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781566398695

9781566398701
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HV9081 .B57 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

These are only some of the voices in Law and Order and School, Shira Bimbaum's riveting study of an education and rehabilitation program for troubled teenagers in a Southern city. Locally acclaimed as one of the better programs of its kind in the region, Academy exemplifies a new kind of institution, providing transitional school services under contract with both educational and juvenile justice agencies. Birnbaum's narrative focuses on curriculum, teaching, behavior management, and the social organization and culture of the program, offering a close-up view of the everyday classrom interactions that frame student achievement and, ultimately, program outcomes. What do students learn? What do teachers teach? What educational and rehabilitative goals are embedded in official and unofficial policy? What processes inside and outside the building help or hinder the attainment of those goals? As educational and justice agencies increasingly turn to private subcontractors to deliver an array of services and growing numbers of young people are channeled into non-traditional educational settings and correctional institutions, it is imperative that educators and the general public understa


Summary

These are only some of the voices in Law and Order and School, Shira Bimbaum's riveting study of an education and rehabilitation program for troubled teenagers in a Southern city. Locally acclaimed as one of the better programs of its kind in the region, Academy exemplifies a new kind of institution, providing transitional school services under contract with both educational and juvenile justice agencies. Birnbaum's narrative focuses on curriculum, teaching, behavior management, and the social organization and culture of the program, offering a close-up view of the everyday classrom interactions that frame student achievement and, ultimately, program outcomes. What do students learn? What do teachers teach? What educational and rehabilitative goals are embedded in official and unofficial policy? What processes inside and outside the building help or hinder the attainment of those goals? As educational and justice agencies increasingly turn to private subcontractors to deliver an array of services and growing numbers of young people are channeled into non-traditional educational settings and correctional institutions, it is imperative that educators and the general public understa


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Juvenile justice includes educational rights, but legislation in most states requires that violent or disruptive students be segregated. Out of need, "reform schools" were developed, which more recently morphed into "private contract alternative schools," which are run under contract with both educational and juvenile justice agencies. Educational consultant Birnbaum takes us inside an education and rehabilitation program at an unnamed school in an undisclosed location in the South. She used participant observation as a reporting methodology to create an engaging "you are there" perspective that examines all facets of the system. Students negotiate and sign a contractual agreement stating which classes they promise to complete and which behaviors they promise to change. The premise of the school system is called the Market System of Merit. Along with regular subjects, attitude, respect, leadership, and participation are also taught. Readers view this system from the inside and learn what is taught and why. Does it work? You decide. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries. Sandra Isaacson, OAO/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

Juvenile justice includes educational rights, but legislation in most states requires that violent or disruptive students be segregated. Out of need, "reform schools" were developed, which more recently morphed into "private contract alternative schools," which are run under contract with both educational and juvenile justice agencies. Educational consultant Birnbaum takes us inside an education and rehabilitation program at an unnamed school in an undisclosed location in the South. She used participant observation as a reporting methodology to create an engaging "you are there" perspective that examines all facets of the system. Students negotiate and sign a contractual agreement stating which classes they promise to complete and which behaviors they promise to change. The premise of the school system is called the Market System of Merit. Along with regular subjects, attitude, respect, leadership, and participation are also taught. Readers view this system from the inside and learn what is taught and why. Does it work? You decide. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries. Sandra Isaacson, OAO/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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