Cover image for Racing & (E)racing language : living with the color of our words
Title:
Racing & (E)racing language : living with the color of our words
Author:
Goldner, Ellen J.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
xvi, 300 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780815628910

9780815628927
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS153.M56 R3 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Explores poetry, critical essays, personal narrative, dialogue, and political speech of diverse ethnic groups in America's history. This anthology - the first of its kind - considers the poetry, critical analysis of literature and language, personal narrative, dialogue and political speech by African American, Asian American, and European American authors. Racing and (E)Racing explores geners in American literature from the 1850s through the 1990s - from work songs to poetry; from fiction to theater. This book sheds light on many kinds of American language and throws into relief the written word as a shifting common ground - a charged and unpredictable space - where different voices, ethnic groups, and classes exert different kinds and varying degrees of influence on one another.


Summary

Explores poetry, critical essays, personal narrative, dialogue, and political speech of diverse ethnic groups in America's history. This anthology - the first of its kind - considers the poetry, critical analysis of literature and language, personal narrative, dialogue and political speech by African American, Asian American, and European American authors. Racing and (E)Racing explores geners in American literature from the 1850s through the 1990s - from work songs to poetry; from fiction to theater. This book sheds light on many kinds of American language and throws into relief the written word as a shifting common ground - a charged and unpredictable space - where different voices, ethnic groups, and classes exert different kinds and varying degrees of influence on one another.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

More critical essay anthologies are being constructed around a dialogical axis, and a form emerging from this finds the prose fabric stitched by poetry and other genres. Goldner and Henderson-Holmes achieve connections between subject texts, text, and related media that help explain the text. Two transcribed conversations between the editors bookend the contents. Goldner and Henderson-Holmes insist that the reader confront serious race dialogues, the obvious properties of racialism, and the almost pathological desire of white Americans especially to ignore, avoid, or deny participating in healing discussions about race. In this volume African American scholars, a novelist, an attorney, and poets interface with Japanese American and Jewish American contributors, with excellent results. Wendy Matooka's essay on Jade Snow Wong's Fifth Chinese Daughter and Hisaye Yamamoto's critically neglected short story "Wilshire Bus"; Juliana Chang on Lawson Inada's jazz poetics; McKay Jenkins's probing yet sympathetic discussion of Lillian Smith; the inspiration Kathy Engel draws from Audre Lorde to propose an "antiracist feminism"--all these give this book its power. The spirit of the collaboration buttresses this innovative contribution to cultural studies, with its implicit understanding that dialogue is one of the powers of the feminine. A valuable resource for all collections. R. Welburn University of Massachusetts at Amherst


Choice Review

More critical essay anthologies are being constructed around a dialogical axis, and a form emerging from this finds the prose fabric stitched by poetry and other genres. Goldner and Henderson-Holmes achieve connections between subject texts, text, and related media that help explain the text. Two transcribed conversations between the editors bookend the contents. Goldner and Henderson-Holmes insist that the reader confront serious race dialogues, the obvious properties of racialism, and the almost pathological desire of white Americans especially to ignore, avoid, or deny participating in healing discussions about race. In this volume African American scholars, a novelist, an attorney, and poets interface with Japanese American and Jewish American contributors, with excellent results. Wendy Matooka's essay on Jade Snow Wong's Fifth Chinese Daughter and Hisaye Yamamoto's critically neglected short story "Wilshire Bus"; Juliana Chang on Lawson Inada's jazz poetics; McKay Jenkins's probing yet sympathetic discussion of Lillian Smith; the inspiration Kathy Engel draws from Audre Lorde to propose an "antiracist feminism"--all these give this book its power. The spirit of the collaboration buttresses this innovative contribution to cultural studies, with its implicit understanding that dialogue is one of the powers of the feminine. A valuable resource for all collections. R. Welburn University of Massachusetts at Amherst


Table of Contents

Safiya Henderson-Holmes and Ellen J. GoldnerSafiya Henderson-HolmesEllen J. Goldner and Safiya Henderson-HolmesEllen J. GoldnerSafiya Henderson-HolmesGale Patricia JacksonTed WilsonKimiko HahnKathy EngelSafiya Henderson-HolmesMcKay JenkinsTed WilsonKimiko HahnJuliana ChangSafiya Henderson-HolmesKimberly Rae ConnorKathy EngelKathy EngelKeith GilyardWendy MotookaTed WilsonArthur FlowersKathy EngelDominique ParkerSafiya Henderson-HolmesSafiya Henderson-Holmes and Ellen J. GoldnerSafiya Henderson-Holmes and Ellen J. GoldnerSafiya Henderson-HolmesEllen J. Goldner and Safiya Henderson-HolmesEllen J. GoldnerSafiya Henderson-HolmesGale Patricia JacksonTed WilsonKimiko HahnKathy EngelSafiya Henderson-HolmesMcKay JenkinsTed WilsonKimiko HahnJuliana ChangSafiya Henderson-HolmesKimberly Rae ConnorKathy EngelKathy EngelKeith GilyardWendy MotookaTed WilsonArthur FlowersKathy EngelDominique ParkerSafiya Henderson-HolmesSafiya Henderson-Holmes and Ellen J. Goldner
Contributorsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Friendly Town, going #1p. 12
Conversation Onep. 14
Part 1. Embodying Struggles
Allegories of Exposure: The Heroic Slave and the Heroic Agonistics of Frederick Douglassp. 31
Friendly Town, being # 15p. 56
"If He Asks You Was I Running You Tell Him I Was Flying, If He Asks You Was I Laughing You Tell Him I Was Crying": Reading John Henry as American History 1870p. 57
Laissez-fairep. 77
Revolutionsp. 80
Toward an Antiracist Feminismp. 84
Friendly Town, being #2p. 93
Part 2. (Un)Balancing Psyches
Metaphors of Race and Psychological Damage in the 1940s American South: The Writings of Lillian Smithp. 99
Cheesep. 124
Blindsidedp. 127
Time, Jazz, and the Racial Subject: Lawson Inada's Jazz Poeticsp. 134
Friendly Town, being #10p. 155
Negotiating the Differences: Anna Deavere Smith and Liberation Theaterp. 158
A Letter to My Soulp. 183
Nowp. 190
Part 3. Contesting Identities
A Legacy of Healing: Words, African Americans, and Powerp. 195
"Nothing Solid": Racial Identity and Identification in Fifth Chinese Daughter and "Wilshire Bus"p. 207
Passenger Sidep. 233
Literary Blues and the Sacred Textp. 238
Prayer for Corap. 252
In the Spaces Between the Words: An Interpretation and Performance of Identityp. 256
Whitep. 268
Conversation Twop. 272
Works Citedp. 285
Indexp. 295
Acknowledgementsp. 299
Contributorsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Friendly Town, going #1p. 12
Conversation Onep. 14
Part 1. Embodying Struggles
Allegories of Exposure: The Heroic Slave and the Heroic Agonistics of Frederick Douglassp. 31
Friendly Town, being # 15p. 56
"If He Asks You Was I Running You Tell Him I Was Flying, If He Asks You Was I Laughing You Tell Him I Was Crying": Reading John Henry as American History 1870p. 57
Laissez-fairep. 77
Revolutionsp. 80
Toward an Antiracist Feminismp. 84
Friendly Town, being #2p. 93
Part 2. (Un)Balancing Psyches
Metaphors of Race and Psychological Damage in the 1940s American South: The Writings of Lillian Smithp. 99
Cheesep. 124
Blindsidedp. 127
Time, Jazz, and the Racial Subject: Lawson Inada's Jazz Poeticsp. 134
Friendly Town, being #10p. 155
Negotiating the Differences: Anna Deavere Smith and Liberation Theaterp. 158
A Letter to My Soulp. 183
Nowp. 190
Part 3. Contesting Identities
A Legacy of Healing: Words, African Americans, and Powerp. 195
"Nothing Solid": Racial Identity and Identification in Fifth Chinese Daughter and "Wilshire Bus"p. 207
Passenger Sidep. 233
Literary Blues and the Sacred Textp. 238
Prayer for Corap. 252
In the Spaces Between the Words: An Interpretation and Performance of Identityp. 256
Whitep. 268
Conversation Twop. 272
Works Citedp. 285
Indexp. 295
Acknowledgementsp. 299

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