Cover image for My self, my muse : Irish women poets reflect on life and art
Title:
My self, my muse : Irish women poets reflect on life and art
Author:
Haberstroh, Patricia Boyle.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
xiii, 167 pages : portraits ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780815629092

9780815629108
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PR8733 .M9 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A collection of essays written by well-known contemporary Irish women poets about their lives in relation to their own poetics. It is a conglomeration of voices around common themes, which have recently and forcefully emerged to permanently change Irish poetry.


Summary

A unique look into the minds and creative processes of contemporary Irish women poets, this book focuses on the transformation of their life experiences into poetry that blends personal identity with national identiry. It assembles many voices around common themes that are emerging to change Irish poetry permanently.

Patricia Boyle Haberstroh, whose book Women Creating Women: Contemporary Irish Women Poets was a Choice Outstanding Academic book in 1996, shows in this new work how nine of the most prolific Irish women writers generate their poetry, broadening our understanding of the context of the poems. She pairs each author's verse with a companion (and often autobiographical)

prose piece to illuminate the ways in which the poetry expresses the poet's personal

experience.

As women in a politically and religiously charged, male-dominated genre and country, these poets feel compelled to transcend daily life by articulating against the "norm." In this book, they describe the issues they confronted in their growth as poets and the strategies they developed to translate life into art. In linking these poets-drawn from Northern Ireland and England as well as the Republic

of Ireland-Haberstroh throws into relief the characteristics that define their unique, individual subjects, themes, and styles.


Author Notes

Patricia Boyle Haberstroh is professor of English at La Salle University. She is the author of Women Creating Women: Contemporary Irish Women Poets (also published by Syracuse University Press).


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

It is difficult to ascertain the audience for this book, which consists of maddeningly tantalizing fragments. The Irish women poets featured here are Eil?an N! Chullean in, Mary O'Malley, Nuala N! Dhomhnaill, Catherine Byron, Eithne Strong, Eavan Boland, Joan Newman, Moya Cannon, and Mebh McGuckian. Each provides one poem (some only excerpts), one studio photo, and an essay focusing on her identity as "Irish," "woman," and "poet." (Two of the essays have been published elsewhere.) If this is meant as an introduction to these writers' work, there is not enough poetry; if it is meant to be biographical or critical, the same problem is true, although in several cases this is the only autobiographical material published on the author. Everything provided is excellent, but it's like cuisine minceur you will need to find other sources of nourishment, which the book's fine bibliography will help you do. For large general collections and Irish and women's studies collections. Shelley Cox, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

For this "sequel of sorts" to her Women Creating Women: Contemporary Irish Women Poets (CH, Jul'96), Haberstroh (La Salle Univ.) asked nine poets to consider "ideas associated with the words woman, Irish, and poet" and to present them in prose pieces accompanied by illustrative poems. The result is this valuable collection that complements her previous discussion of Eilean Ni Chuilleanain, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, Eithne Strong, Eavan Boland, and Medbh McGuckian and also provides a rich source of autobiographical information for the careers and writing practices of Moya Cannon, Catherine Byron, Mary O'Malley, and Joan Newmann. Boland's essay-manifesto gains added point when read along with the other writers' poignant accounts. What is striking is the similarity of experience--despite differences of generation, social background, and place of origin. O'Malley and Ni Dhomhnaill speak of ancestors and the Irish language; Strong describes the pain of breaking free of family to find her own way in 1940s Dublin; and Newmann pays homage to her fellow members of the Belfast Group of the 1960s. Cannon's and McGuckian's contributions offer valuable insights into their creative processes. All collections: undergraduate, graduate, faculty, and general. D. R. McCarthy Huron College


Library Journal Review

It is difficult to ascertain the audience for this book, which consists of maddeningly tantalizing fragments. The Irish women poets featured here are Eil?an N! Chullean in, Mary O'Malley, Nuala N! Dhomhnaill, Catherine Byron, Eithne Strong, Eavan Boland, Joan Newman, Moya Cannon, and Mebh McGuckian. Each provides one poem (some only excerpts), one studio photo, and an essay focusing on her identity as "Irish," "woman," and "poet." (Two of the essays have been published elsewhere.) If this is meant as an introduction to these writers' work, there is not enough poetry; if it is meant to be biographical or critical, the same problem is true, although in several cases this is the only autobiographical material published on the author. Everything provided is excellent, but it's like cuisine minceur you will need to find other sources of nourishment, which the book's fine bibliography will help you do. For large general collections and Irish and women's studies collections. Shelley Cox, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

For this "sequel of sorts" to her Women Creating Women: Contemporary Irish Women Poets (CH, Jul'96), Haberstroh (La Salle Univ.) asked nine poets to consider "ideas associated with the words woman, Irish, and poet" and to present them in prose pieces accompanied by illustrative poems. The result is this valuable collection that complements her previous discussion of Eilean Ni Chuilleanain, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, Eithne Strong, Eavan Boland, and Medbh McGuckian and also provides a rich source of autobiographical information for the careers and writing practices of Moya Cannon, Catherine Byron, Mary O'Malley, and Joan Newmann. Boland's essay-manifesto gains added point when read along with the other writers' poignant accounts. What is striking is the similarity of experience--despite differences of generation, social background, and place of origin. O'Malley and Ni Dhomhnaill speak of ancestors and the Irish language; Strong describes the pain of breaking free of family to find her own way in 1940s Dublin; and Newmann pays homage to her fellow members of the Belfast Group of the 1960s. Cannon's and McGuckian's contributions offer valuable insights into their creative processes. All collections: undergraduate, graduate, faculty, and general. D. R. McCarthy Huron College


Table of Contents

Paula MeehanPatricia Boyle HaberstrohPaula MeehanPatricia Boyle Haberstroh
Illustrationsp. ix
Contributorsp. xi
Prologue: Not Your Musep. 1
Introductionp. 3
Eilean Ni Chuilleanain
J'ai Mal a nos Dentsp. 17
Nuns: A Subject for a Woman Writerp. 18
Mary O'Malley
Weaknessp. 33
"Between the Snow and the Huge Roses"p. 34
Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill
In Memoriam Elly Ni Dhomhnaill (1884-1963)p. 47
Ce Leis Tu?p. 49
Catherine Byron
Cryptp. 59
An Appetite for Fasting?p. 61
Eithne Strong
The Mahonys Observedp. 73
Married to the Enemyp. 74
Eavan Boland
From Anna Liffeyp. 93
The Irish Woman Poet: Her Place in Irish Literaturep. 95
Joan Newmann
Applep. 109
Coming of Agep. 110
Moya Cannon
Nightp. 123
The Poetry of What Happensp. 124
Medbh McGuckian
Crystal Nightp. 135
Rescuers and White Cloaks: Diary, 1968-1969p. 137
Epilogue: Poetry Doesn't Pay
Rita Ann Higginsp. 155
Works Citedp. 159
Indexp. 165
Illustrationsp. ix
Contributorsp. xi
Prologue: Not Your Musep. 1
Introductionp. 3
Eilean Ni Chuilleanain
J'ai Mal a nos Dentsp. 17
Nuns: A Subject for a Woman Writerp. 18
Mary O'Malley
Weaknessp. 33
"Between the Snow and the Huge Roses"p. 34
Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill
In Memoriam Elly Ni Dhomhnaill (1884-1963)p. 47
Ce Leis Tu?p. 49
Catherine Byron
Cryptp. 59
An Appetite for Fasting?p. 61
Eithne Strong
The Mahonys Observedp. 73
Married to the Enemyp. 74
Eavan Boland
From Anna Liffeyp. 93
The Irish Woman Poet: Her Place in Irish Literaturep. 95
Joan Newmann
Applep. 109
Coming of Agep. 110
Moya Cannon
Nightp. 123
The Poetry of What Happensp. 124
Medbh McGuckian
Crystal Nightp. 135
Rescuers and White Cloaks: Diary, 1968-1969p. 137
Epilogue: Poetry Doesn't Pay
Rita Ann Higginsp. 155
Works Citedp. 159
Indexp. 165

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