Cover image for Athena unbound : the advancement of women in science and technology
Title:
Athena unbound : the advancement of women in science and technology
Author:
Etzkowitz, Henry, 1940-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
282 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction: Women in science: Why so few? -- The science career pipeline -- Women and science: Athena bound -- Gender, sex, and science -- Selective access -- Critical transitions in the graduate and post-graduate career path -- Women's (and men's) graduate experience in science -- The paradox of critical mass for women in science -- The "kula ring" of scientific success -- Women's faculty experience -- Dual male and female worlds of science -- Differences between women in science -- Social capital and faculty network relationships -- Negative and positive departmental cultures -- Initiatives for departmental change -- International comparisons -- Athena unbound: policy for women in science.
ISBN:
9780521563802

9780521787383
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
Q130 .E85 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Why are there still so few female scientists? Despite the scientific ethos of universalism and inclusion, women continue to experience real social inequities as they struggle to gain recognition in the scientific community. Based on extensive interviews and backed by quantitative analysis, this compelling work exposes the hidden barriers, subtle exclusions, and unwritten rules that confront women at every juncture along the scientific career path--from childhood to retirement. Through vivid personal accounts the authors offer an illuminating and sobering view of the effects these obstacles have on the personal and professional lives of women. They argue that women can succeed in the scientific workplace by successfully managing "social capital," those networks and relationships scientists rely on for professional support and new ideas. This benchmark volume is vital reading for all scientists and social scientists--both male and female--and for women considering a scientific career.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This in-depth inquiry into why there are so few women scientists isn't the first study of its kind, nor is it likely to be the last. Certainly advancements have been made since such famous pioneers as Lise Meitner and Rachel Carson faced blatant resistance to their quests. More girls and young women study science than ever before, resulting in a notable increase in the number of women science graduate students, yet, compared to their male colleagues, few go on to achieve professional success. Etzkowitz and his coauthors, Carol Kemelgor and Brian Uzzi, conducted numerous interviews with women and men to determine the difference in their academic and professional experiences, and they have identified some subtle and insidious factors that contribute to women scientists' marginalization. The authors balance their extremely detailed analysis with a humanistic perspective as they compare and contrast the status of women scientists in different countries, characterize both exclusionary and supportive forms of networking, and, ultimately, offer some surprising and hopeful conclusions. Donna Seaman


Choice Review

There has been a proliferation of books on the topic of women in science and technology since the mid-80s, and it would seem as if Athena Unbound would only reiterate the same issues, the same miniscule progress, and the dearth of solutions. In some respects, it does so. However, Etzkowitz and colleagues also advance some new ideas, such as the notion of "social capital" easily accrued by men in contrast to the social isolation experienced by women, and they present a valuable analysis of how instrumental social capital is to advancement and success in the sciences. They draw on some new empirical studies of women faculty in the sciences and the experience of those who have left science in the proverbial pipeline. In addition, there is a very important chapter on international comparisons (material that is difficult to find elsewhere) and a suggestive chapter on initiatives for change. Well written and well documented, this is a scholarly study of a contemporary problem that, as t he authors point out, has economic, social, and personal implications. Excellent index; comprehensive bibliography. Undergraduates through faculty; professionals. M. H. Chaplin Wellesley College


Table of Contents

Introduction: women in science: why so few?
1 The scientific career pipeline
2 Women and science
3 Gender, sex and science
4 Selective access
5 Critical transitions in the graduate and post-graduate career path
6 Women's (and men's) Graduate experience in science
7 The paradox of critical mass for women in science
8 The Kula ring of scientific success
9 Women's faculty experience
10 Dual male and female worlds of science
11 Differences between women in science
12 Social capital and faculty network relationships
13 Negative and positive departmental cultures
14 Initiatives for departmental change
15 International comparisons
16 Athena unbound: policy for women in science
Appendix
Index