Cover image for On the move : how and why animals travel in groups
Title:
On the move : how and why animals travel in groups
Author:
Boinski, Sue.
Publication Information:
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xi, 811 pages : illustrations, maps; 24 pages cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780226063393

9780226063409
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QL775 .O6 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Getting from here to there may be simple for one individual. But as any parent, scout leader, or CEO knows, herding a whole troop in one direction is a lot more complicated. Who leads the group? Who decides where the group will travel, and using what information? How do they accomplish these tasks?

On the Move addresses these questions, examining the social, cognitive, and ecological processes that underlie patterns and strategies of group travel. Chapters discuss how factors such as group size, resource distribution and availability, the costs of travel, predation, social cohesion, and cognitive skills affect how individuals as well as social groups exploit their environment. Most chapters focus on field studies of a wide range of human and nonhuman primate groups, from squirrel monkeys to Turkana pastoralists, but chapters covering group travel in hyenas, birds, dolphins, and bees provide a broad taxonomic perspective and offer new insights into comparative questions, such as whether primates are unique in their ability to coordinate group-level activities.


Summary

Getting from here to there may be simple for one individual. But as any parent, scout leader, or CEO knows, herding a whole troop in one direction is a lot more complicated. Who leads the group? Who decides where the group will travel, and using what information? How do they accomplish these tasks?

On the Move addresses these questions, examining the social, cognitive, and ecological processes that underlie patterns and strategies of group travel. Chapters discuss how factors such as group size, resource distribution and availability, the costs of travel, predation, social cohesion, and cognitive skills affect how individuals as well as social groups exploit their environment. Most chapters focus on field studies of a wide range of human and nonhuman primate groups, from squirrel monkeys to Turkana pastoralists, but chapters covering group travel in hyenas, birds, dolphins, and bees provide a broad taxonomic perspective and offer new insights into comparative questions, such as whether primates are unique in their ability to coordinate group-level activities.


Author Notes

Robert A. Barton: Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, University of Durham, United Kingdom.
Benjamin B. Beck: Department of Mammals and Division of Zoological Research, National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C.
Sue Boinski: Department of Anthropology and Division of Comparative Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Erin E. Boydston: Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Richard W. Byrne: Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland.
Colin A. Chapman: Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Lauren J. Chapman: Department of Zoology, University of Florida Gainesville.
Marina Cords: Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, New York.
Fred C. Dyer: Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Paul A. Garber: Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana.
Russell Greenberg: Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C.
Kay E. Holekamp: Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Charles Janson: Department of Ecology and Evolution, State University of New York.
Peter M. Kappeler: Deutsches Primatenzenturm Abt. Verhaltenforschung/Okologie, Gottingen Germany.
Margaret F. Kinnaird: Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
William R. Leonard: Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.
J. Terrence McCabe: Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder.
Charles R. Menzel: Language Research Center, Georgia State University, Decatur.
Katharine Milton: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, Division of Insect Biology, University of California Berkeley.
Timothy G. O'Brien: Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
Carlos A. Peres: School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich United Kingdom.
Marcia L. Robertson: Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.
Laura Smale: Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Rachel Smolker: Biology Department, University of Vermont, Burlington.
Karen Steudel: Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Adrian Treves: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
David P. Watts: Department of Anthropology, Yale University New Haven, CT.
David Sloan Wilson: Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University.


Robert A. Barton: Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, University of Durham, United Kingdom.
Benjamin B. Beck: Department of Mammals and Division of Zoological Research, National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C.
Sue Boinski: Department of Anthropology and Division of Comparative Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Erin E. Boydston: Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Richard W. Byrne: Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland.
Colin A. Chapman: Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Lauren J. Chapman: Department of Zoology, University of Florida Gainesville.
Marina Cords: Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, New York.
Fred C. Dyer: Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Paul A. Garber: Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana.
Russell Greenberg: Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C.
Kay E. Holekamp: Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Charles Janson: Department of Ecology and Evolution, State University of New York.
Peter M. Kappeler: Deutsches Primatenzenturm Abt. Verhaltenforschung/Okologie, Gottingen Germany.
Margaret F. Kinnaird: Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
William R. Leonard: Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.
J. Terrence McCabe: Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder.
Charles R. Menzel: Language Research Center, Georgia State University, Decatur.
Katharine Milton: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, Division of Insect Biology, University of California Berkeley.
Timothy G. O'Brien: Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
Carlos A. Peres: School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich United Kingdom.
Marcia L. Robertson: Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.
Laura Smale: Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Rachel Smolker: Biology Department, University of Vermont, Burlington.
Karen Steudel: Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Adrian Treves: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
David P. Watts: Department of Anthropology, Yale University New Haven, CT.
David Sloan Wilson: Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Most animals, especially vertebrates, live in social groups that travel together among food sources and resting places. In this anthology, 28 authors consider the rationales behind group travel. Although not immediately obvious from the title, most of the 22 chapters focus on primates (those human relatives including prosimians, monkeys, and apes). Four major topics are investigated: ecological benefits (and costs) of social travel; cognition; decision making; and processes of social interaction in travel. The book also contains a section including most of the nonprimate chapters in comparative focus: birds, cetaceans, and carnivores as well as extinct and modern humans. The editors provide a short but insightful concluding chapter, drawing some patterns out of the otherwise unconnected contributions and suggesting future goals. A unified bibliography and relatively brief index close the volume. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. E. Delson; CUNY Herbert H. Lehman College


Choice Review

Most animals, especially vertebrates, live in social groups that travel together among food sources and resting places. In this anthology, 28 authors consider the rationales behind group travel. Although not immediately obvious from the title, most of the 22 chapters focus on primates (those human relatives including prosimians, monkeys, and apes). Four major topics are investigated: ecological benefits (and costs) of social travel; cognition; decision making; and processes of social interaction in travel. The book also contains a section including most of the nonprimate chapters in comparative focus: birds, cetaceans, and carnivores as well as extinct and modern humans. The editors provide a short but insightful concluding chapter, drawing some patterns out of the otherwise unconnected contributions and suggesting future goals. A unified bibliography and relatively brief index close the volume. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. E. Delson; CUNY Herbert H. Lehman College


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Unraveling the Complexities of Group Travel
Part 1 Ecological Costs and Benefits
1 The Physiology and Energetics of Movement: Effects on Individuals and GroupsKaren Steudel
2 Determinants of Group Size in Primates: The Importance of Travel CostsColin A. Chapman and Lauren J. Chapman
3 A Critical Evaluation of the Influence of Predators on Primates: Effects on Group TravelSue Boinski and Adrian Treves and Colin A. Chapman
4 Mixed-Up Species Association and Group MovementMarina Cords
5 Territorial Defense and the Ecology of Group Movements in Small-Bodied Neotropical PrimatesCarlos A. Peres
Part 2 Cognitive Abilities, Possibilities, and Constraints
6 Group Movement and Individual Cognition: Lessons from Social InsectsFred C. Dyer
7 Spatial Movement Strategies: Theory, Evidence, and ChallengesCharles Janson
8 Primate Brain Evolution: Cognitive Demands of Foraging or of Social Life?Robert A. Barton
9 Animal Movement as a Group-Level AdaptationDavid Sloan Wilson
Part 3 Travel Decisions
10 Evidence for the Use of Spatial, Temporal, and Social InformationPrimate Foragers and Paul A. Garber
11 Homing and Detour Behavior in Golden Lion Tamarin Social GroupsCharles R. Menzel and Benjamin B. Beck
12 Comparative Movement Patterns of Two Semiterrestrial Cercopithecine Primates: The Tana River Crested Mangabey and the Sulawesi Crested Black MacaqueMargaret F. Kinnaird and Timothy G. O'Brien
13 Mountain Gorilla Habitat Use Strategies and Group MovementsDavid P. Watts
14 Quo Vadis? Tactics of Food Search and Group Movement in Primates and Other AnimalsKatharine Milton
Part 4 Social Processes
15 Social Manipulation Within and Between Troops Mediates Primate Group MovementSue Boinski
16 Grouping and Movement Patterns in Malagasy PrimatesPeter M. Kappeler
17 How Monkeys Find Their Way: Leadership, Coordination, and Cognitive Maps of African BaboonsRichard W. Byrne
Part 5 Group Movement from a Wider Taxonomic Perspective
18 Birds of Many Feathers: The Formation and Structure of Mixed-Species Flocks of Forest BirdsRussell Greenberg
19 Keeping in Touch at Sea: Group Movement in Dolphins and WhalesRachel Smolker
20 Group Travel in Social CarnivoresKay E. Holekamp and Erin E. Boydston and Laura Smale
21 Ecological Correlates of Home Range Variation in Primates: Implications for Hominid EvolutionWilliam R. Leonard and Marcia L. Robertson
22 Patterns and Processes of Group Movement in Human Nomadic Populations: A Case Study of the Turkana of Northwestern KenyaJ. Terrence McCabe
Concluding Remarks
New Directions for Group MovementSue Boinski and Paul A. Garber
Appendix: Classification of Living Primates
Contributors
References
Subject Index
Species Index
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Unraveling the Complexities of Group Travel
Part 1 Ecological Costs and Benefits
1 The Physiology and Energetics of Movement: Effects on Individuals and GroupsKaren Steudel
2 Determinants of Group Size in Primates: The Importance of Travel CostsColin A. Chapman and Lauren J. Chapman
3 A Critical Evaluation of the Influence of Predators on Primates: Effects on Group TravelSue Boinski and Adrian Treves and Colin A. Chapman
4 Mixed-Up Species Association and Group MovementMarina Cords
5 Territorial Defense and the Ecology of Group Movements in Small-Bodied Neotropical PrimatesCarlos A. Peres
Part 2 Cognitive Abilities, Possibilities, and Constraints
6 Group Movement and Individual Cognition: Lessons from Social InsectsFred C. Dyer
7 Spatial Movement Strategies: Theory, Evidence, and ChallengesCharles Janson
8 Primate Brain Evolution: Cognitive Demands of Foraging or of Social Life?Robert A. Barton
9 Animal Movement as a Group-Level AdaptationDavid Sloan Wilson
Part 3 Travel Decisions
10 Evidence for the Use of Spatial, Temporal, and Social InformationPrimate Foragers and Paul A. Garber
11 Homing and Detour Behavior in Golden Lion Tamarin Social GroupsCharles R. Menzel and Benjamin B. Beck
12 Comparative Movement Patterns of Two Semiterrestrial Cercopithecine Primates: The Tana River Crested Mangabey and the Sulawesi Crested Black MacaqueMargaret F. Kinnaird and Timothy G. O'Brien
13 Mountain Gorilla Habitat Use Strategies and Group MovementsDavid P. Watts
14 Quo Vadis? Tactics of Food Search and Group Movement in Primates and Other AnimalsKatharine Milton
Part 4 Social Processes
15 Social Manipulation Within and Between Troops Mediates Primate Group MovementSue Boinski
16 Grouping and Movement Patterns in Malagasy PrimatesPeter M. Kappeler
17 How Monkeys Find Their Way: Leadership, Coordination, and Cognitive Maps of African BaboonsRichard W. Byrne
Part 5 Group Movement from a Wider Taxonomic Perspective
18 Birds of Many Feathers: The Formation and Structure of Mixed-Species Flocks of Forest BirdsRussell Greenberg
19 Keeping in Touch at Sea: Group Movement in Dolphins and WhalesRachel Smolker
20 Group Travel in Social CarnivoresKay E. Holekamp and Erin E. Boydston and Laura Smale
21 Ecological Correlates of Home Range Variation in Primates: Implications for Hominid EvolutionWilliam R. Leonard and Marcia L. Robertson
22 Patterns and Processes of Group Movement in Human Nomadic Populations: A Case Study of the Turkana of Northwestern KenyaJ. Terrence McCabe
Concluding Remarks
New Directions for Group MovementSue Boinski and Paul A. Garber
Appendix: Classification of Living Primates
Contributors
References
Subject Index
Species Index

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