Cover image for Nuclear legacy : students of two atomic cities
Title:
Nuclear legacy : students of two atomic cities
Author:
McQuerry, Maureen, 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Columbus, OH : Battelle Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xxiii, 306 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Summary:
Students from Slavutych, Ukraine, and Richland, Washington, describe the effects of growing up in communities purposely developed in secrecy and isolation because of their nuclear-based industry and discuss their future in these towns as demand for nuclear energy declines.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781574770872
Format :
Book

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library HD9698.A2 M4 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This breakthrough book brings together articles authored by students of the Tri-Cities area in the state of Washington and Slavutych, Ukraine who share a common inheritance--coming of age in a nuclear community. Slavutych is located near the Chornobyl nuclear power plant. The Tri-Cities area is near the Hanford nuclear research facility, which produced the plutonium for the first atomic bomb. Slavutych student include firsthand stories of the evacuation from Chornobyl and Prypyat. Tri-Cities students include interviews with scientists who designed and operated some of Hanford's first reactors, as well as current community leaders. The book includes color photographs taken by the students, plus historical photos from their respective cities.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up-A book with a particularly interesting premise and perspective. The authors are 13-to-16-year-old students from two communities that have been deeply affected by the development and aftermath of the atomic age: Richland, WA, where plutonium was processed for the Manhattan Project; and Slavutych, Ukraine, site of much of the devastation of the Chornobyl nuclear power plant disaster in 1986. The essays cover the history of each town, the development of nuclear power and warfare, the secrecy involved in having family members working in this industry, and just growing up and doing normal things in extraordinary circumstances. Each piece is presented in English and Russian, although the translation into English is frequently very poor. The strongest aspects are the dramatic first-person accounts of the Soviet accident and interviews with prominent individuals and students on the future of their cities. Background information includes short sketches on Enrico Fermi, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Los Alamos, and the U.S. Department of Energy. Overall, though, the work is bogged down by too much irrelevant information, such as extensive local history and descriptions of wildlife (well done, but not related to the atomic situation at all). However, the primary concern is the overwhelming lack of documentation and citation. With very few exceptions, events, quotes, and statistics are presented with no sources listed. Full-color photos taken by the students are scattered throughout. While this book is an impressive example of what students in two countries can accomplish together in presenting stories seldom told, the negatives outweigh the positives for most collections.-Andrew Medlar, Chicago Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction
Reflections on Nuclear Culture
Part I History
Chapter 1 The Frontierp. 1
Native Americans
The Nez Perce
The River People
Lewis and Clark
Early Settlers and Farmers
Early Towns
1st School White Bluffs
Old Hanford School
Slavutych History
Chapter 2 Hanford Beginnings - The Atomic Bomb and the Manhattan Projectp. 39
Site Selection
Uranium
Seaborg
Plutonium
Matthias
Los Alamos
Fermi
Oppenheimer
A Final Effort
Conclusion
Losing the Land
Military History
Security
Chapter 3 Hanford Community - WWII - Cold Warp. 77
Termination Winds
Alphabet Houses
Women at Hanford
Day's Pay
Secrets
Disposal Act
The Cold War
Chapter 4 Chornobyl Beginningsp. 107
Site Selection
Site Construction
Chapter 5 Prypyatp. 111
Building of Prypyat
The Workforce
Chapter 6 Reactorsp. 115
Introduction
Plutonium
Radiation
Chornobyl Reactor Design
Hanford's Reactors-B
N Reactor
Reactor Safety
Chapter 7 The Chornobyl Disasterp. 131
The Accident
Emergency Response
Heroes
Evacuation of Prypyat
When Can We Come Back to Prypyat?
International Response
Soviet Explanation
A Tragedy of the Century
Object Shelter
Part II The Communities Today
Chapter 8 Nuclear Legacy Richlandp. 159
U.S. DOE
Types of Waste
Exploring the K-Basins
Remediation
The Hanford Reach
Ferruginous Hawks
Peregrine Falcons
Bald Eagles and Salmon
Chapter 9 Nuclear Legacy--Chornobyl and Slavutychp. 179
Chornobyl NPP
All Flesh
Mice and Men Struggle for Their Lives
Animals Of the Exclusion Zone
Chapter 10 City of Slavutych Todayp. 189
The Symbol of Infinity
White Angel City
Cultural Life of Slavutych
The Break-up of the Soviet Union
Chapter 11 City of Richlandp. 205
The Community
Spudnut Shop
Columbia River
Columbia Basin College
WSU
Mayor of Richland
Chapter 12 Diversification in the Business Communityp. 215
Mr. Tri-Cities
Port of Benton
21st Century City
Business in Slavutych
TACIS
Richland
FFTF
Nuclear Medicine
Medical Isotopes
Chapter 13 Diversification in Science and Technologyp. 251
Slavutych Laboratory
Spire
Geosafe
EMSL
Samms
Hammer
Part III The Future
Chapter 14 The Future of Nuclear Energyp. 273
Public's Misgivings
Nuclear Power
Globe
Chapter 15 Student Voicesp. 283
The Future of Richland
The Future of Slavutych

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