Cover image for History of the ancient & medieval world
Title:
History of the ancient & medieval world
Author:
Dijkstra, Henk.
Publication Information:
New York : Marshall Cavendish Corp., 1996-
Physical Description:
12 volumes ; 30 cm
General Note:
Completely rev. and updated ed. of: The Adventure of mankind. 1995.
Language:
English
Added Author:
Added Title:
Adventure of mankind.
ISBN:
9780761403579

9780761403517

9780761403524

9780761403531

9780761403548

9780761403555

9780761403562

9780761403586

9780761403593

9780761403609

9780761403616

9780761403623

9780761403630
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 1 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 12 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 11 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 10 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 9 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 8 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 7 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 6 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 5 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 4 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 3 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library D23 .H58 1996 V. 2 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Beginning with prehistory and continuing to the brink of the European Renaissance, this reference set offers readers comprehensive coverage of a diversity of ancient and medieval civilizations and cultures. In addition to the Greeks and Romans, it introduces readers to the Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Phoenicians, Jews, Hittites, among many others.


Reviews 26

Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This set cuts a rather wide swath, covering a time frame of prehistory to circa 1500. It is in many respects a typical Marshall Cavendish set, edited by scholars with the late-elementary-and secondary-school-aged student in mind and lavishly illustrated. According to the publisher's note in the first volume, there are "2,200 vibrant full-color illustrations and photographs" in the set. After the preface, each volume of the 11 main volumes (the twelfth is the index to the set) is thematically arranged, with individual essays within each. Articles are unsigned, though each volume has its own preface signed by a scholar in the discipline. The volumes typically contain about 10 or 11 related essays. The Middle Ages, for example, includes essays on Charlemagne, early medieval politics, and the early Byzantine Empire. Each volume concludes with a time line related to the volume's subject matter, a glossary of terms, a bibliography subdivided by each essay's topic and often with a list of further reading, and an index. The index volume includes a glossary from all volumes combined, a cumulative bibliography (though oddly omitting any "further readings" mentioned in the individual volumes), thematic indexes, and a cumulative index. The bibliographies are fairly up to date, with many entries published in 1995. The entire set is very readable and will certainly be welcome by educators and librarians trying to find an eye-pleasing set for what could otherwise be mundane topics for students. It breaks away from a strictly chronological arrangement at two points: volume 7, Religions of the World, and volume 11, Empires of the Ancient World. Religions of the World includes topics such as Buddhism and Chinese philosophy that are difficult to pin down to a specific time frame. Empires of the Ancient World surveys non-European civilizations, such as the Aztecs and the Mongols. Those topics are indicative of the entire set's attempt to be as culturally balanced as possible. Perhaps more important, the set bridges a gap in history from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the late Middle Ages that is often glossed over in other works for students. Recommended for middle-school, secondary, and public libraries, though it could as easily find a home in a circulating as a reference collection, given the thematic nature of the set and broad essays.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Twelve beautifully designed and logically arranged volumes of information spanning from the beginning of civilization 3.5 billion years ago to 1543, the date considered the terminus of the medieval era. Arranged by topic, then subdivided chronologically, each volume contains thorough articles that are easy to read without being tedious. Exceptional graphical layout adds much more value to the set, as the full-color photographs, charts, maps, and diagrams offer visual links to the text. Each book concludes with a full time line, followed by a detailed glossary and bibliography, and ends with suggestions for further reading and a remarkably complete index. The master index to the set is equally impressive in its attention to detail. This set will become the resource for students seeking information on this time period, making the purchase price an investment in future generations' understanding of ancient and medieval history. A high-priority item for high school libraries.‘J. B. MacDonald, Milner Library, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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