Cover image for The minstrel's melody
Title:
The minstrel's melody
Author:
Tate, Eleanora E.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Middleton, WI : Pleasant Company Publications, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
163 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps; 21 cm.
Summary:
In 1904, twelve-year-old Orphelia follows her dream by running away from home to join an all-black minstrel show headed for the Saint Louis World's Fair, and learns about her family's troubled past in the process.
General Note:
"American girl."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
740 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.1 5.0 52609.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.2 9 Quiz: 24773.
ISBN:
9781584853114

9781584853107
Format :
Book

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Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Clarence Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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East Delavan Branch Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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East Delavan Branch Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Hamburg Library X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In 1904, twelve-year-old Orphelia Bruce runs away from her small town of Calico Creek, Missouri, to pursue her dream of a singing career. She stows away on a traveling


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. This entry in the History Mysteries series is more adventure than mystery. It features an African American protagonist, Orphelia, who loves to sing and play the piano, despite her mother's objections. Orphelia sets her sights on winning a talent contest; the winner will get to perform at the St. Louis World's Fair. Before the talent show, however, Orphelia gets in trouble for poking around an abandoned building. Mama punishes Orphelia by forbidding her to take part in the talent show, and Orphelia responds by running away. Thus begins an on-the-road adventure that ends with Orphelia performing in St. Louis and also solving a painful family mystery involving the disappearance of an uncle who was lynched. Tate spins an enjoyable story that effectively portrays both the trials of a musically gifted child and the difficulties faced by African Americans in a largely segregated society. A "Peek Into the Past" chapter provides added background on the novel's 1904 Missouri setting. A smooth weave of entertainment and information. --Denise Wilms


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