Cover image for Medea
Title:
Medea
Author:
Euripides.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Medea. English
Publication Information:
New York : Dover Publications, 1993.
Physical Description:
ix, 47 pages ; 21 cm.
General Note:
"Unabridged"--Cover.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780486275482
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PA3975.M4 W34 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PA3975.M4 W34 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

One of the most powerful and enduring of Greek tragedies, Medea centers on the myth of Jason, leader of the Argonauts, who has won the dragon-guarded treasure of the Golden Fleece with the help of the sorceress Medea. Having married Medea and fathered her two children, Jason abandons her for a more favorable match, never suspecting the terrible revenge she will take.
Euripides' masterly portrayal of the motives fiercely driving Medea's pursuit of vengeance for her husband's insult and betrayal has held theater audiences spellbound for more than twenty centuries. Rex Warner's authoritative translation brings this great classic of world literature vividly to life.


Author Notes

Euripides was born in Attica, Greece probably in 480 B.C. He was the youngest of the three principal fifth-century tragic poets. In his youth he cultivated gymnastic pursuits and studied philosophy and rhetoric. Soon after he received recognition for a play that he had written, Euripides left Athens for the court of Archelaus, king of Macedonia.

Fragments of about fifty-five plays survive. Among his best-known plays are Alcestis, Medea and Philoctetes, Electra, Iphigenia in Tauris, The Trojan Women, and Iphigenia in Aulis Iphigenia. He died in Athens in 406 B.C.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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