Cover image for That's ghosts for you : 13 scary stories
Title:
That's ghosts for you : 13 scary stories
Author:
Carus, Marianne.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Chicago : Front Street/Cricket Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
viii, 134 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
An international collection of spine-tingling stories, including such titles as "Bigger than Death, " "The Airi, " and "The Man Who Sang to Ghosts."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
730 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.5 7 Quiz: 31815 Guided reading level: R.
ISBN:
9780812626759
Format :
Book

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Library
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Material Type
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Central Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Clarence Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Clinton Branch Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library PZ5 .T3135 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

This tantalizing volume collects creepy stories from around the globe, nine first published in the award-winning children's magazine Cricket, and four previously unpublished. If you dare, turn off all the lights and take the plunge into darkness and terror. You never know when you might run into a ghost, or host of ghosts! It could be on the side of a desolate country road, underwater in a crowded public swimming pool, or behind the windswept dunes on a sunny stretch of beach. From hauntedScottish bagpipes to the terrifying Weeping Woman of Mexican folklore to a vengeful clan of Japanese ghouls, these spine-tingling tales depict spirits from many diverse cultures. Among the 13 stories guaranteed to chill your soul, stop your heart, and send you shivering under the covers are: "A Place of Haunts" by Robert Culp; "The Mysterious Girl at the Pool" by Juanita Havill; "Bones" by Frank Dodge; "Triple Anchovies" by Marion Dane Bauer; and "The Airi" by Deepa Agarwal.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-8. Carus has compiled old favorites and contemporary stories into a absorbing collection of ghoulish, accessible tales. The 13 ghost tales are similarly paced and structured; and each one has the feel of an oft-repeated folktale. International settings "ranging from Japan, to Scotland, the Isle of Man, and even Round Rock, Texas," give the book a broad scope and allow for a bit of appealing local color. Children will appreciate the mostly preteen protagonists, whose fear is overshadowed by their curiosity and spunk. At their best, the tales show secret interactions between the young characters and their phantom discoveries in which all are enhanced by the encounter. Whether offering an insight or simply a jolt of terror, the collection provides a good deal for young readers to savor. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Carus has gathered together 13 scary stories, some of which were previously published in Cricket magazine. All of the tales are well written, but two are particularly chilling. Gerry Armstrong's "The Haunting of the Pipes" tells about a long-dead gamekeeper who had sworn that no one but he would play his bagpipes. Nearly 100 years later, two boys find out that his decree is still true. In Juanita Havill's "The Mysterious Girl at the Pool," a young swimmer is rescued from a watery grave by a girl who met the same fate years earlier. Other selections include Nancy Etchemendy's "Bigger Than Death," in which a courageous mother dog befriends two children who desperately want a pet. Eric A. Kimmel puts a new spin on "Wiley and the Hairy Man" with his "Mary Jo and the Hairy Man." The best one of the bunch is Marion Dane Bauer's "Triple Anchovies." On Halloween night, two girls discover that the elderly neighbor they want to "trick" is a prankster herself. YongSheng Xuan's black-and-white paper-cut illustrations set off the stories beautifully, especially Aaron Shepard's "The Man Who Sang to Ghosts," set in Japan. This collection provides a nice balance to gory horror books like R. L. Stine's "Goosebumps" series (Scholastic).-Elaine Baran Black, Gwinnett County Public Library, Lawrenceville, GA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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