Cover image for Robert Louis Stevenson
Title:
Robert Louis Stevenson
Author:
Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894.
Uniform Title:
Poems. Selections
Publication Information:
New York : Sterling, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Summary:
An illustrated collection of thirty-two popular poems by Robert Louis Stevenson, mostly from "A Child's Garden of Verses." Includes an introduction about the poet's life and work.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780806949567
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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Status
Central Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Angola Public Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library PR5489 .A3 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

"A collection of 32 poems...A short introductory biography...gives an insightful glimpse into his life and how it influenced his poems....illustrations convey the poetic notion of a romantic childhood memory, with pink-cheeked children...Muted colors, rich with warm golden accents among the dominant green tone, are a peaceful accompaniment to the poems."-- School Library Journal . "These poems...are colorfully illustrated and notable for their detailed brushstrokes of gentle colors. They interpret the verse in a style that is fanciful without looking too juvenile for a middle-grade audience. Younger children will find the poems and illustrations to their liking as well."-- Booklist .


Author Notes

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886.

With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much.

Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5, younger for reading aloud. As in the other volumes of the Poetry for Young People series, this illustrated collection of verse begins with a well-written, four-page introduction to the poet. These poems, chosen mainly from A Child's Garden of Verses, are colorfully illustrated and notable for their detailed brushstrokes of gentle colors. They interpret the verse in a style that is fanciful without looking too juvenile for a middle-grade audience. Younger children will find the poems and illustrations to their liking as well. A taste of Stevenson for young readers. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-A collection of 32 poems, taken mostly from A Child's Garden of Verses. A short introductory biography with quotes taken from the writer's letters gives an insightful glimpse into his life and how it influenced his poems. The illustrations convey the poetic notion of a romantic childhood memory, with pink-cheeked children, many depicted from behind or fast asleep. Fanciful, dreamlike scenes of being king for a day, peering down on "the land of counterpane," and a king riding a unicorn in a circus parade are full of intriguing details. Muted colors, rich with warm golden accents among the dominant green tone, are a peaceful accompaniment to the poems.-Ronald Jobe, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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