Cover image for Destined for liberty : the human person in the philosophy of Karol Wojtyła/John Paul II
Title:
Destined for liberty : the human person in the philosophy of Karol Wojtyła/John Paul II
Author:
Kupczak, Jarosław, 1964-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : Catholic University of America Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xxiii, 169 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780813209845

9780813209852
Format :
Book

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library BD450 .K82 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This work offers an introduction to John Paul II's theory of the human person. The development of Karol Wojtyla's theology is developed - from his lesser-known writings such as The Lublin Lectures - to his more popular writings Love and Responsibility and The Acting Person. The author finds that Wojtyla is a consistent thinker. Unlike many of his contemporaries, his thought has never undergone any intellectual revolution or change. His earlier writings thus make possible a fuller appreciation of the more popular texts and Papal encyclicals.


Summary

This work offers an introduction to John Paul II's theory of the human person. The development of Karol Wojtyla's theology is developed - from his lesser-known writings such as ""The Lublin Lectures"" - to his more popular writings ""Love and Responsibility"" and ""The Acting Person"". The author finds that Wojtyla is a consistent thinker. Unlike many of his contemporaries, his thought has never undergone any intellectual revolution or change. His earlier writings thus make possible a fuller appreciation of the more popular texts and Papal encyclicals. The mystical theology of St John of the Cross, the thought of St Thomas Aquinas, and modern phenomemology (especially that of Max Scheler) is examined. Among the key anthropological concepts presented and analyzed are: ethical values and human freedom; the relation between freedom and truth, the conscience and consciousness; the human body; and the process of human recognition.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Karol Wojtyla was a professional philosopher before he became a bishop, and Kupczak clearly traces the main streams of thought in his intellectual formation. First Kupczak notes that, even before he was a philosopher, Wojtyla was an actor, playwright, and poet. That experience made him particularly sympathetic to the phenomenological tradition, which, unlike the empiricism and positivism that have dominated Anglo-American philosophy, attends first to concrete wholes experienced by whole persons acting in the world. For Wojtyla, phenomenology meant especially Max Scheler, whose ethics informed his earliest philosophical work. Kupczak depicts Wojtyla's philosophy as a critical synthesis of phenomenological (Schelerian) and metaphysical (Aristotelian-Thomist) strands of a philosophical anthropology depicting the person as efficient cause of his or her own action. Interrupted when he became bishop of Krakow, Wojtyla's philosophical career has continually informed his enormously influential subsequent writings. Kupczak's invaluable introduction to the philosophical background of the papacy of John Paul II accessibly equips readers to encounter the pope's work as an original and sustained contribution to philosophy. --Steve Schroeder


Booklist Review

Karol Wojtyla was a professional philosopher before he became a bishop, and Kupczak clearly traces the main streams of thought in his intellectual formation. First Kupczak notes that, even before he was a philosopher, Wojtyla was an actor, playwright, and poet. That experience made him particularly sympathetic to the phenomenological tradition, which, unlike the empiricism and positivism that have dominated Anglo-American philosophy, attends first to concrete wholes experienced by whole persons acting in the world. For Wojtyla, phenomenology meant especially Max Scheler, whose ethics informed his earliest philosophical work. Kupczak depicts Wojtyla's philosophy as a critical synthesis of phenomenological (Schelerian) and metaphysical (Aristotelian-Thomist) strands of a philosophical anthropology depicting the person as efficient cause of his or her own action. Interrupted when he became bishop of Krakow, Wojtyla's philosophical career has continually informed his enormously influential subsequent writings. Kupczak's invaluable introduction to the philosophical background of the papacy of John Paul II accessibly equips readers to encounter the pope's work as an original and sustained contribution to philosophy. --Steve Schroeder


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