Cover image for Super-completely and totally the messiest
Title:
Super-completely and totally the messiest
Author:
Viorst, Judith.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Olivia, who is very neat and practically perfect, despairs because her sister Sophia is super-completely and totally the messiest person, no matter where she goes or what she does.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
620 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.9 0.5 46510.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.2 2 Quiz: 25005 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689829413
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Collins Library J. PIC Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Concord Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Grand Island Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Kenmore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lake Shore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Niagara Branch Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Orchard Park Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Williamsville Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

There's nobody in the world as messy as Sophie. Just ask her older sister Olivia, who is, of course, perfectly neat. When Olivia opens the door to Sophie's room, it's hard to find her amid all the stuff on the floor and spilling out of Sophie's drawers and closet. And it's not just in her room that Sophie is messy. It's at school, on Halloween, and even when she makes breakfast in bed for her mother on Mother's Day. Listen to Olivia. She's an older sister and she knows: Sophie is not just messy. She is super-completely and totally the MESSIEST. Oh...there are some good things about Sophie, too. She's kind and nice and funny and great at puzzles and dancing. But Olivia is willing to bet her best bracelet that Sophie will never be practically perfect, like her.Judith Viorst's totally messy Sophie and oh-so-virtuous Olivia will speak to slobs and neatniks alike. Robin Preiss Glasser's wonderful drawings, full of delicious details, bring both of these sisters to vibrant life.


Author Notes

Judith Viorst was born in Newark, New Jersey on February 2, 1931. She graduated from Rutgers University (1952) and the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute (1981).

She has written extensively, her works include children's books, collections of poetry, lyrics to musicals, several works of fiction, and a cookbook. She has won a Silver Pencil award (for The Tenth Good Thing About Barney) and an Emmy (for poems used in an Anne Bancroft TV special).

(Bowker Author Biography) Judith Viorst is the bestselling author of "Forever Fifty," "How Did I Get to Be Forty," "Necessary Losses," & several other works. She is also the author of the classic children's book "Alexander & the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day." A graduate of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute, she is the recipient of various awards for her journalism & psychological writings. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband, political writer Milton Viorst. They have three sons.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-9. Neatnik Olivia introduces her little sister Sophie, a poster child for Slobs of the World, who creates total chaos everywhere she goes. Olivia delivers her lengthy indictment of her sister's habits without heat or even self-righteousness, ending with a bland tally of Sophie's good points and a vague wish that "one of these days she'll start to remember to stop forgetting to try NOT to be so super-completely and totally THE MESSIEST." The pictures inject an exuberance that's missing from Viorst's galloping text. Glasser, illustrator of Jacqueline Preiss Weitzman's You Can't Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum (1998), draws the great drifts of clutter in precise, hilariously detailed black and white, making Sophie's outlandish dress and huge, wild crown of red hair spring from the pages. A comical, if oddly distant, character portrait. --GraceAnne DiCandido


Publisher's Weekly Review

The title of this slender tale from the team behind Alexander, Who's Not (Do you hear me? I mean it!) Going to Move describes Sophie, who is as clumsy as she is messy. Sophie's neat-as-a-pin, "practically perfect" older sister, Olivia, characterizes Sophie in an intermittently humorous, yet rather tedious, litany of her disheveled sibling's mishaps. Glasser's animated artwork delivers much of the comedy; the cartoonish illustrations capture both Sophie's unruly appearance and behavior with an appealing, light touch and always convey the girl's big heart. Kid-tickling detail abounds in such images as the copious contents of Sophie's closet spilling out and entirely burying the child, and Sophie painting a self-portrait literally on her classroom desk (the legs of which sport her yellow rubber boots). Glasser handles Sophie's cluttered world with aplomb, using pen-and-ink to outline her surroundings and a judicious touch of watercolor to keep readers' focus on the relevant action. Yet the single-themed narrative becomes repetitious. The greatest strength of the volume is the loving family's acceptance of Sophie's many quirks and their obvious affection for her. Though Sophie may not have the staying power of Viorst's perennially popular Alexander, her antics will surely elicit grinsÄand perhaps even gigglesÄfrom young readers. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Olivia emphatically states that her younger sister, Sophie, is the messiest human being around and proceeds to tell of the chaos that her sibling creates. Glasser's pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations are full of inviting detail. They show Sophie's closet contents; a bedroom impassible with toys, clothes, and artistic creations; numerous experimental doll projects gone awry; mishaps at the beach and farm; and always the exuberant Sophie who tries, really tries, to be more like the neat and nearly perfect Olivia. While the younger child works her havoc outside the boundaries of acceptable (and believable) behavior, the narrator hastens to add that dad says that Sophie is smart and funny; their older brother adds that she's great at dancing and puzzles; and mom says that Sophie's really a kind and nice person. It's all pure fun with an undertone of acceptance that's positively reassuring, and maybe even a little bit encouraging, to creative clutzes and anyone else who has ever messed up while messing around.-Susan Hepler, Burgundy Farm Country Day School, Alexandria, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview