Cover image for 1921
Title:
1921
Author:
Llywelyn, Morgan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Forge, 2001.
Physical Description:
445 pages ; 25 cm
Summary:
The life of Irish journalist, Henry Mooney, who struggles to report fairly on the failed 1916 Rising, the creation of the Irish Free State, and the Irish Civil War.
General Note:
"A Tom Doherty Associates book."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780312867546

9780765326935
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The Irish fight for independence is one of the most captivating tales of the twentieth century. Morgan Llywelyn, the acclaimed historical writer of books like Lion of Ireland, Bard and The Horse Goddess , is the writer born to bring this epic battle to life. Having created an entire body of work chronicling the Celts and Ireland, she now turns to recent Irish history to create a multivolume saga: The Irish Century. 1921 tells the story of the Irish War of Independence and the heartbreaking civil war that followed. Henry Mooney, a reporter for the Clare Champion and the Irish Bulletin , is a self-described "moderate nationalist" who struggles to see the truth in the news of the day, and to report it fairly. Lacking more radical Republican beliefs of his dear friends Ned Halloran and Sile Duffy, Henry reports the political - and later, bloody - actions of his fellow Irishman from the ashes of the failed 1916 Rising to the creation of the Irish Free State to the tragic and wide-ranging battles of the Irish Civil War.Meanwhile, Henry feels the impact of these history-changing events in his own personal life. His friendship with Ned falters when their political beliefs diverge, and an unexpected tragedy leaves them further apart than ever. Henry struggles with his passion for a well-bred Protestant Anglo-Irish woman, Ella Rutledge, and as he dutifully reports the events in the political battle for independence, he comes to realize that the Irish struggle for freedom wil leave no life untouched - and no Irish citizen with a dry eye or an untroubled heart.


Author Notes

Author and historian Morgan Llywelyn was born in New York City to Irish parents. As a teenager, she moved to Texas and by the age of sixteen was showing horses at championship levels throughout the United States. She made the shortlist for the United States Olympic Team in Dressage in 1976, but did not make the team. She also modeled for Neiman-Marcus and was a dance instructor for Arthur Murray.

She writes historical novels that deal with her Celtic roots and is recognized as an expert in early Irish history and folklore. Her first novel was The Wind from Hastings, but she is better known for her second novel Lion of Ireland: The Legend of Brian Boru, which was published in 1980 and has never been out of print. In 1990, she started writing for children and young adults. She won the 1991 Irish Children's Book Trust Bisto Award for Brian Boru and the 1993 Bisto Award in the Historical Fiction category and the 1993 Reading Association of Ireland Award for Strongbow: The Story of Richard and Aoife. She also writes short stories and has co-authored two fantasy novels with Michael Scott. She currently lives in Ireland.

(Bowker Author Biography) Morgan Llywelyn is the bestselling author of Lion of Ireland, Brian Boru: Emperor of the Irish, 1916, and Druids. She lives in Dublin, Ireland.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Llywelyn continues her magnificent multivolume saga chronicling the twentieth-century struggle for Irish independence. As in 1916 (1998), she masterfully interweaves historical figures and events with fictional ones, providing both a panoramic and an intimate view of the Irish Civil War. Incessantly haunted by the rather passive role he played in the doomed Easter Rebellion, Henry Mooney, a journalist struggling for objectivity in the midst of controversy and mayhem, reevaluates his own convictions and commitment to the cause of a free Ireland. When Henry falls in love with an Anglo-Irish woman, simmering tensions wrought by centuries of domination and repression are reflected in a microcosm of passion and agony. The lucid narrative and the compelling subject matter will enthrall both Irish history buffs and fans of sweeping historical fiction. --Margaret Flanagan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Llywelyn's second novel in the series she inaugurated with 1916 (1998) furthers her investigation of Irish history by focusing on Ireland's struggle for freedom from Britain. This volume begins in 1917 in the aftermath of the Easter Rising and carries through to the civil war and the establishment of the Republic of Ireland. That Llywelyn knows her Irish history, culture, language and ambience is unquestionable. Unfortunately, in her attempt to amalgamate her encyclopedic knowledge of Ireland with the fictional adventures of Henry Mooney, a journalist torn between the traditional demands of family and personal ambition and his commitment to his country, she produces a story that is as dense as an Irish bog and nearly as confusing to navigate. Henry, a supporter of the Republican cause but a political moderate and neutral observer by nature, moves with alacrity among the various factions, apparently enjoying journalistic immunity as he uses his pen to further the Irish cause and attack the British. As the situation in the country deteriorates, Henry's personal life becomes more complex. Smitten with passionate S¬°le Halloran, but unable to possess her since she is the wife of his best friend and Easter veteran Ned (protagonist of 1916), Henry falls in love with beautiful Anglo-Irish siren Ella Rutledge, further dividing his loyalties. Often sliding into essayistic prose, with footnotes supplementing the text, the novel depicts events and political developments in exhaustive detail. Though the account of the civil war is thorough and nuanced, readers of 1916 and other popular books by Llywelyn (Lion of Ireland; Bard, etc.) may be taken aback by the historical heft of this offering. (Mar.) Forecasts: Llywelyn is a popular writer and this book won't hurt her sales record, boosted as it will be by an excerpt in the mass market edition of The Last Prince of Ireland (due out March 1), an eight-city author tour, national ad/promo and the availability of a reading group guide (the book is caboosed by 17 pages of source notes and bibliography). (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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