Cover image for Five smooth stones : Hope's diary
Title:
Five smooth stones : Hope's diary
Author:
Gregory, Kristiana.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, 2001.
Physical Description:
109 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 20 cm.
Summary:
In her diary, a young girl writes about her life and the events surrounding the beginning of the American Revolution in Philadelphia in 1776.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
640 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.4 2.0 50150.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.1 5 Quiz: 23711 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780439148276
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area
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Clarence Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
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Collins Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Concord Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
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Dudley Branch Library X Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenilworth Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
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Kenmore Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
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Lancaster Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
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Orchard Park Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library X Juvenile Fiction On Display
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Audubon Library J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Kristiana Gregory's first My America, book one of Hope's Diary, details in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. Part of the My America series, this story is set in 1776 Philadelphia, where nine-year-old Hope records events both large and small in her diary. The greatest worry is for her father, a patriot who has gone on a sea journey and is overdue. Other trials include school, where a nasty schoolmaster makes things difficult, and her brother's running away to become a Tory. The intense political developments of those days are sketched in via brief references to delegates and their work. The war's presence grows too, and by the story's end, Hope and her family must flee Philadelphia to stay at her uncle's farm. Gregory does an effective job of evoking the times; the hard work routinely done by young children may be an eye opener for today's readers. Story-wise, however, kids may be unhappy that the fates of Hope's father and brother are left hanging. --Denise Wilms


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