Cover image for Farmer Brown shears his sheep : a yarn about wool
Title:
Farmer Brown shears his sheep : a yarn about wool
Author:
Sloat, Teri.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dorling Kindersley, 2000.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 23 x 28 cm
Summary:
Farmer Brown shears his sheep and has their wool made into yarn, but after they beg to have it back he knits the yarn into sweaters for them.
General Note:
"DK Ink."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.7 0.5 45223.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 22951 Guided reading level: N.
ISBN:
9780789426376
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
Searching...
Clarence Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...
Eden Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Kenilworth Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Orchard Park Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Farmer Brown was shearing sheep

Piling up a snowy heap

Of wool that filled his shed, knee-deep.

He took their wool and left them fuzz.

But what happens when the temperature drops and his newly shorn sheep begin to shiver?

Follow Farmer Brown's determined sheep in this hilarious adventure as they track down their missing fleece and discover -- to their amazement -- what it's become.

Is it too late to get it

BAAAAACK?


Author Notes

Teri Sloat grew up in Salem, in the Willamette Valley where berry crops are grown. As a child, as soon as school was out for the summer, Sloat went to work in the fields. Her and her friends picked berries from 5am until 4pm.

Sloat had planned on teaching art in high school. She met her husband in college and before they began teaching high school, they were given a chance to move to rural Alaska and teach elementary school in a small Yup'ik village at the mouth of the Yukon River. They lived and taught for 12 years on the Kuskokwim and Yukon Rivers in Yup'ik villages.

Sloat has been publishing books for children since 1989.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-5. Like Doreen Cronin's Click, Clack, Moo [BKL Ap 1 00], where the cows go on strike, this is a farmyard farce about how the animals get power. The sheep want their fleece back. After Farmer Brown shears his flock, they're cold and shivery, so they run after him as he takes their fleece to be washed and combed and carded, then spun and dyed into yarn. Finally, they tangle themselves in the yarn and make him notice their shivers--so he knits each sheep a sweater. The rhyme is simple and funny, great for reading aloud, and Westcott's wacky ink-and-watercolor cartoon-style pictures capture the silliness--and the logic--of the barnyard struggle and the final bucolic bliss. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Bouncy verse takes readers right into a common rural scene: "Farmer Brown was shearing sheep,/Piling up a snowy heap/Of wool that filled his shed, knee-deep." Meanwhile, the silly illustrations hint at a story that is anything but ordinary: unshorn sheep are huddled together in wide-eyed dread, while those who have been buzzed are shivering. The cold creatures want their wool back and follow Farmer Brown as he takes it from place to place to have it washed, combed, carded, spun, and dyed until he finally takes pity on them and "Knit-purl, knit-purl,/The farmer's fingers looped and twirled" and he creates colorful sweaters for each one. "Now each year, come shearing time,/The sheep wait eagerly in line/To feel the clip and hear the buzz,/And wear bright sweaters over fuzz." The consistently cheerful and unstrained rhyme spins a great yarn, and at the same time pleasantly conveys facts about wool processing. Westcott's characteristically humorous watercolor cartoons will evoke a few giggles as the bare sheep peek in windows, chase the farmer, get tangled in the yarn, and finally warm up in their cozy sweaters. Pair this lighthearted romp with this creative team's Farmer Brown Goes Round and Round (DK Ink, 1999) and The Thing That Bothered Farmer Brown (Orchard, 1995).-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview