Cover image for Mr. Persnickety and Cat Lady
Title:
Mr. Persnickety and Cat Lady
Author:
Johnson, Paul Brett.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Orchard Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
Mr. Persnickety objects to Cat Lady's many cats and resorts to drastic action to get rid of them.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 45326.
ISBN:
9780531332832

9780531302835
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Boston Free Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Collins Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Mr. Persnickety might have tolerated living next door to one cat. (He's allergic to them, or so he says.) But Cat Lady can't stop at just one. Fat, skinny, long-haired, short-haired, hard-luck, or purebreds, thirty-seven cats of all sorts soon settle into her house. For Mr. Persnickety, this means war -- and Cat Lady has no plans to surrender. A rousing battle of wills, and an exercise in learning to get along, this high-spirited tale is gleefully illustrated and wryly told.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Cat Lady is the proud owner of 37 felines. Her next-door neighbor, Mr. Persnickety, tries everything to get rid of them: squirting a garden hose at them, blaring a recording of 100 barking dogs, and complaining to the Humane Society. All of his efforts are in vain; in fact, the Humane Society gives Cat Lady an "Award of Excellence." She quickly tires of Mr. Persnickety's pranks and sneaks some mice inside his house. The rodents "multiplied like mushrooms," invading every crevice of his home, and making a nest in his favorite teddy bear. The look on the man's face at this indignity is worth the price of the book. Mr. Persnickety is forced to ask his neighbor and her cats for help. The story ends with the two on the verge of friendship, but the last page hints that there may still be trouble ahead. The brightly colored acrylic illustrations mirror the humorous text in perfect balance; the double-page spreads are the most pleasing. Pair this hilarious picture book with Paul Brett Johnson's The Cow Who Wouldn't Come Down (Orchard, 1993) for a rollicking storyhour.-Meghan R. Malone, Turner Free Library, Randolph, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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