Cover image for Armadillo tattletale
Title:
Armadillo tattletale
Author:
Ketteman, Helen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Schoalstic Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Armadillo's habit of eavesdropping and then misreporting what he hears makes the other animals so angry that they find a way to keep him from overhearing their private conversations.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 640 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 41941.

Reading Counts RC K-2 4.2 2 Quiz: 21684 Guided reading level: N.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780590997232
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Collins Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"A busybody armadillo learns the consequences of eavesdropping and gossiping.... Graves' waggish illustrations...are painted in striking deep hues." - Kirkus Reviews "The animals are all indigenous to Louisiana and Texas, so the book could be used to give a lighter touch to a Southern/Southwestern U.S. unit, or, then again, it could be read aloud for just plain fun, which it definitely is." - School Library Journal


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-8. Minding your own business can be tricky. It's even tougher when ears take on the proportions of a satellite dish, as is the case in this original folktale. Armadillo's jackrabbit ears field whisperings like aerial antennas, but it isn't eavesdropping that gets him in trouble. It's repeating the gossip strangely askew that ticks off his "friends," who show their displeasure by refusing to let him take a drink of fresh water. A toothy gator eventually holds Armadillo accountable: he snips Armadillo's ears (and thus his hearing radius) down to size. The animals that first told the tales escape responsibility without a nibble. Ketteman, who deftly retold Cinderella with a masculine twang in Bubba, the Cowboy Prince (1997), sticks with a Lonestar staple here, the armadillo, but although this story has its moments, it doesn't quite live up to the Prince. --Kelly Milner Halls


Publisher's Weekly Review

This pourquoi cum cautionary tale maintains that "in the bare bones beginning, Armadillo's ears were as tall as a jackrabbit's." Any time one prairie animal confides in another, Armadillo's burro-like listening devices can be seen protruding from a bush or desert rock, vibrating as they collect secret information. With an evident gleam in his squinty eyes, Armadillo then passes the hurtful news along. He doesn't desist until he tattles on Alligator, who "nipped and snipped and clipped at Armadillo's ears until there was nothing left but tiny, teeny, itsy, weenie little ears." Ketteman (Heat Wave) justifies the punishment by listing Armadillo's repeat offenses; each injured party throws "one humongous hissy fit," and each embarrassed gossiper gives Armadillo "the what-for and the how-come and the why-not," to no avail. Graves (Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance) provides earth-tone images of arid Texas grassland, populated by critters like Rattlesnake, Blue Jay and Muskrat. He styles the title character as an obsequious, elephant-gray coward, given to sniveling when confronted. Ketteman and Graves provide a comical folktale, especially relevant to little pitchers. Ages 5-10. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-"In the bare bones beginning," Armadillo had huge, tall ears and could hear everything the other animals said. He loved to eavesdrop and then tell tales on them-tales that were a little bit twisted to make trouble. For instance, Armadillo told Blue Jay that Egret thought he was scraggly looking, and "Blue Jay squalled and he bawled, and he squawked and he gawked, and he otherwise threw one humongous hissy fit." After Armadillo made trouble for several other animals, Alligator decided to teach him an unforgettable lesson, and now, "you may hide in the bushes and listen as long as you like, but you will never, ever catch an armadillo telling tales." Bold, stylized illustrations in acrylic, ink, and colored pencil accompany the humorous, imaginative text, adding to the story's appeal-the exaggerated expressions on Armadillo's face are particularly amusing. The animals are all indigenous to Louisiana and Texas, so the book could be used to give a lighter touch to a Southern/Southwestern U.S. unit, or, then again, it could be read aloud for just plain fun, which it definitely is.-Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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