Cover image for Dreaming of America : an Ellis Island story
Title:
Dreaming of America : an Ellis Island story
Author:
Bunting, Eve, 1928-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Mahwah, NJ : Bridge Water Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged). : illustrations (some color) ; 21 x 27 cm
Summary:
Annie Moore cares for her two younger brothers on board the ship sailing from Ireland to America where she becomes the first immigrant processed through Ellis Island, January 1, 1892, her fifteenth birthday.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
320 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 3.6 1.0 2506.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.7 3 Quiz: 28021 Guided reading level: N.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816765201

9780816765218
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This moving account, based on the true story of Annie Moore, begins as the fifteen-year-old girl leaves Ireland with her younger brothers on a ship bound for America. As they cross the Atlantic, hoping to be reunited with their parents in New York, Annie is filled with sadness for the family she left behind and trepidation about the strange new country she's headed for. Readers will cheer for Annie as she steps off the gangplank, her saga ending and her new life in America just beginning.


Summary

A Caldecott award -- winning author tells the inspiring true story of the first Ellis Island immigrant, fifteen-year-old Annie Moore.


Author Notes

Eve Bunting was born in 1928 in Maghera, Ireland, as Anne Evelyn Bunting. She graduated from Northern Ireland's Methodist College in Belfast in 1945 and then studied at Belfast's Queen's College. She emigrated with her family in 1958 to California, and became a naturalized citizen in 1969.

That same year, she began her writing career, and in 1972, her first book, "The Two Giants" was published. In 1976, "One More Flight" won the Golden Kite Medal, and in 1978, "Ghost of Summer" won the Southern California's Council on Literature for Children and Young People's Award for fiction. "Smokey Night" won the American Library Association's Randolph Caldecott Medal in 1995 and "Winter's Coming" was voted one of the 10 Best Books of 1977 by the New York Times.

Bunting is involved in many writer's organizations such as P.E.N., The Authors Guild, the California Writer's Guild and the Society of Children's Book Writers. She has published stories in both Cricket, and Jack and Jill Magazines, and has written over 150 books in various genres such as children's books, contemporary, historic and realistic fiction, poetry, nonfiction and humor.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Eve Bunting was born in 1928 in Maghera, Ireland, as Anne Evelyn Bunting. She graduated from Northern Ireland's Methodist College in Belfast in 1945 and then studied at Belfast's Queen's College. She emigrated with her family in 1958 to California, and became a naturalized citizen in 1969.

That same year, she began her writing career, and in 1972, her first book, "The Two Giants" was published. In 1976, "One More Flight" won the Golden Kite Medal, and in 1978, "Ghost of Summer" won the Southern California's Council on Literature for Children and Young People's Award for fiction. "Smokey Night" won the American Library Association's Randolph Caldecott Medal in 1995 and "Winter's Coming" was voted one of the 10 Best Books of 1977 by the New York Times.

Bunting is involved in many writer's organizations such as P.E.N., The Authors Guild, the California Writer's Guild and the Society of Children's Book Writers. She has published stories in both Cricket, and Jack and Jill Magazines, and has written over 150 books in various genres such as children's books, contemporary, historic and realistic fiction, poetry, nonfiction and humor.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-9. Annie Moore was the first Irish immigrant to be processed on Ellis Island, and she landed there on her fifteenth birthday in 1892. Based on her story, this picture book follows the classic immigrant pattern: the scary leavetaking of loving relatives; the long, difficult journey, with Annie caring for her two younger brothers in a cramped cabin; and, finally, the reunion with parents who had gone ahead to find a place. The full-page illustrations are a little glossy and glamorous (not a scarf or button out of place, even when the kids are huddled in steerage), and Annie's character is idealized (she never says an irritable word), but the long text is packed with information that will interest many readers, both for school reports and for the connections with their own family stories. The occasional period photos and prints--of the ship's passenger list with Annie and her brothers' names; of the Annie Moore statue in Ireland--add authenticity to this drama of ordinary people on a hard journey home. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-On January 1, 1892, her 15th birthday, Annie Moore of Cork, Ireland, became the first immigrant to enter the United States through the new facilities at Ellis Island. This fictionalized account describes her voyage across the Atlantic on the SS Nevada with her two younger brothers to join their parents in New York after a three-year separation. Shipboard life in their third-class accommodations, the welcoming ceremony upon landing, and the emotions of the children are described in text and illustration. Despite a somewhat posed, static quality, the realistic illustrations are effective and rich in vibrant blues and browns. Set on flecked, beige paper, they often spill onto the second page of a spread. On several occasions, they are paired with reproductions of archival photographs and records, including the ship's passenger list with the names of the Moore children. An afterword gives what little information is known about Annie and includes a photo of her with her firstborn child. A solid account of a journey that many immigrants made at the turn of the century.-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 5^-9. Annie Moore was the first Irish immigrant to be processed on Ellis Island, and she landed there on her fifteenth birthday in 1892. Based on her story, this picture book follows the classic immigrant pattern: the scary leavetaking of loving relatives; the long, difficult journey, with Annie caring for her two younger brothers in a cramped cabin; and, finally, the reunion with parents who had gone ahead to find a place. The full-page illustrations are a little glossy and glamorous (not a scarf or button out of place, even when the kids are huddled in steerage), and Annie's character is idealized (she never says an irritable word), but the long text is packed with information that will interest many readers, both for school reports and for the connections with their own family stories. The occasional period photos and prints--of the ship's passenger list with Annie and her brothers' names; of the Annie Moore statue in Ireland--add authenticity to this drama of ordinary people on a hard journey home. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-On January 1, 1892, her 15th birthday, Annie Moore of Cork, Ireland, became the first immigrant to enter the United States through the new facilities at Ellis Island. This fictionalized account describes her voyage across the Atlantic on the SS Nevada with her two younger brothers to join their parents in New York after a three-year separation. Shipboard life in their third-class accommodations, the welcoming ceremony upon landing, and the emotions of the children are described in text and illustration. Despite a somewhat posed, static quality, the realistic illustrations are effective and rich in vibrant blues and browns. Set on flecked, beige paper, they often spill onto the second page of a spread. On several occasions, they are paired with reproductions of archival photographs and records, including the ship's passenger list with the names of the Moore children. An afterword gives what little information is known about Annie and includes a photo of her with her firstborn child. A solid account of a journey that many immigrants made at the turn of the century.-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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