Cover image for HTML and XHTML, the definitive guide
Title:
HTML and XHTML, the definitive guide
Author:
Musciano, Chuck.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Fourth edition.
Publication Information:
Beijing ; Cambridge [Mass.] : O'Reilly, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvi, 655 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Rev. ed. of HTML, the definitive guide. 3rd ed. c1998.

Includes index.

Includes one tearout HTML & XHTML quick reference card (folded ; 24 cm.).
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780596000264
Format :
Book

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Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Central Library QA76.76.H94 M88 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

HTML is changing so fast it's almost impossible to keep up with developments. XHTML is HTML 4.0 rewritten in XML; it provides the precision of XML while retaining the flexibility of HTML. HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide, 4th Edition, brings it all together. It's the most comprehensive book available on HTML and XHTML today. It covers Netscape Navigator 6.0, Internet Explorer 5.0, HTML 4.01, XHTML 1.0, JavaScript, Style sheets, Layers, and all of the features supported by the popular web browsers.Learning HTML and XHTML is like learning any new language, computer or human. Most students first immerse themselves in examples. Studying others is a natural way to learn, making learning easy and fun. Imitation can take learning only so far, though. It's as easy to learn bad habits through imitation as it is to acquire good ones. The better way to become HTML-fluent is through a comprehensive reference that covers the language syntax, semantics, and variations in detail and demonstrates the difference between good and bad usage. HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide, 4th Edition, helps in both ways: the authors cover every element of HTML/XHTML in detail, explaining how each element works and how it interacts with other elements. Many hints about HTML/XHTML style smooth the way for writing documents that range from simple online documentation to complex presentations. With hundreds of examples, the book gives web authors models for writing their own effective web pages and for mastering advanced features, like style sheets and frames. HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide, 4th Edition, shows how to:

Implement the XHTML 1.0 standard and prepare web pages for the transition to XML browsers Use style sheets and layers to control a document's appearance Create tables, from simple to complex Use frames to coordinate sets of documents Design and build interactive forms and dynamic documents Insert images, sound files, video, Java applets, and JavaScript programs Create documents that look good on a variety of browsers The book comes with a handy quick reference card listing HTML tags.


Author Notes

Chuck Musciano has spent his life on the East Coast, having spent time in Maryland, Georgia, and New Jersey before acquiring a B.S. in computer science from Georgia Tech in 1982. Since then, he has resided in Melbourne, Florida, in the employ of Harris Corporation. He began his career as a compiler writer and crafter of tools and went on to join Harris' Advanced Technology Group to help develop large-scale multiprocessors. This led to a prolonged interest in user-interface research and development, which finally gave way to his current position, manager of UNIX Systems in Harris' Corporate Data Center. Along the way, he grew to know and love the Internet, having contributed a number of publicly available tools to the Net and started the still-running Internet Movie Ratings Report. The Web was a natural next step, and he has been running various Web sites within and without Harris for several years. Chuck has written on UNIX-related topics in the trade press for the past decade, most visibly as the "Webmaster" columnist for Sunworld Online ( http://www.sun.com/sunworldonline ). In his spare time he enjoys life in Florida with his wife Cindy, daughter Courtney, and son Cole.

Bill Kennedy is currently president and chief technical officer of ActivMedia, Inc., a new media marketing and marketing research company based in beautiful Peterborough, NH, but which conducts business with clients and associates from around the world primarily over the Internet ( http://www.activmedia.com ). When not hacking new HTML pages or writing about them, "Dr. Bill" (Ph.D. in biophysics from Loyola University of Chicago, of all things!) is out promoting a line of mobile, autonomous robots as real-world platforms for artificial intelligence and fuzzy logic research and for education ( http://www.rwii.com ). Or he's out drumming up writing assignments from his former colleagues at IDG's SunWorld/Advanced Systems Magazine (now SunWorld Online; http://www.sun.com ), where he served as a senior editor-features (at-large over the Internet, of course) for nearly five years. Contact Dr. Bill directly at bkennedy@activmedia.com.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xi
1. HTML, XHTML, and the World Wide Webp. 1
1.1. The Internet, Intranets, and Extranetsp. 1
1.2. Talking the Internet Talkp. 5
1.3. HTML: What It Isp. 8
1.4. XHTML: What It Isp. 9
1.5. HTML and XHTML: What They Aren'tp. 10
1.6. Nonstandard Extensionsp. 11
1.7. Tools for the Web Designerp. 13
2. Quick Startp. 16
2.1. Writing Toolsp. 17
2.2. A First HTML Documentp. 17
2.3. Embedded Tagsp. 18
2.4. HTML Skeletonp. 19
2.5. The Flesh on an HTML or XHTML Documentp. 20
2.6. Textp. 21
2.7. Hyperlinksp. 26
2.8. Images Are Specialp. 29
2.9. Lists, Searchable Documents, and Formsp. 32
2.10. Tablesp. 34
2.11. Framesp. 35
2.12. Style Sheets and JavaScriptp. 36
2.13. Forging Aheadp. 37
3. Anatomy of an HTML Documentp. 38
3.1. Appearances Can Deceivep. 38
3.2. Structure of an HTML Documentp. 40
3.3. Tags and Attributesp. 40
3.4. Well-Formed Documents and XHTMLp. 45
3.5. Document Contentp. 45
3.6. HTML Document Elementsp. 47
3.7. The Document Headerp. 50
3.8. The Document Bodyp. 55
3.9. Editorial Markupp. 56
3.10. The [bdo] Tagp. 59
4. Text Basicsp. 61
4.1. Divisions and Paragraphsp. 61
4.2. Headingsp. 69
4.3. Changing Text Appearancep. 76
4.4. Content-Based Style Tagsp. 77
4.5. Physical Style Tagsp. 84
4.6. HTML's Expanded Font Handlingp. 89
4.7. Precise Spacing and Layoutp. 96
4.8. Block Quotesp. 109
4.9. Addressesp. 114
4.10. Special Character Encodingp. 116
5. Rules, Images, and Multimediap. 118
5.1. Horizontal Rulesp. 118
5.2. Inserting Images in Your Documentsp. 126
5.3. Document Colors and Background Imagesp. 154
5.4. Background Audiop. 162
5.5. Animated Textp. 164
5.6. Other Multimedia Contentp. 168
6. Links and Websp. 171
6.1. Hypertext Basicsp. 171
6.2. Referencing Documents: The URLp. 172
6.3. Creating Hyperlinksp. 189
6.4. Creating Effective Linksp. 198
6.5. Mouse-Sensitive Imagesp. 203
6.6. Creating Searchable Documentsp. 214
6.7. Relationshipsp. 218
6.8. Supporting Document Automationp. 223
7. Formatted Listsp. 227
7.1. Unordered Listsp. 227
7.2. Ordered Listsp. 230
7.3. The [li] Tagp. 234
7.4. Nesting Listsp. 237
7.5. Definition Listsp. 239
7.6. Appropriate List Usagep. 243
7.7. Directory Listsp. 244
7.8. Menu Listsp. 245
8. Cascading Style Sheetsp. 248
8.1. The Elements of Stylesp. 249
8.2. Style Syntaxp. 258
8.3. Style Classesp. 263
8.4. Style Propertiesp. 268
8.5. Tag-less Styles: The [span] Tagp. 299
8.6. Applying Styles to Documentsp. 300
9. Formsp. 304
9.1. Form Fundamentalsp. 305
9.2. The [form] Tagp. 305
9.3. A Simple Form Examplep. 314
9.4. Using Email to Collect Form Datap. 315
9.5. The [input] Tagp. 317
9.6. The [button] Tagp. 329
9.7. Multiline Text Areasp. 331
9.8. Multiple Choice Elementsp. 333
9.9. General Form Control Attributesp. 338
9.10. Labeling and Grouping Form Elementsp. 341
9.11. Creating Effective Formsp. 345
9.12. Forms Programmingp. 349
10. Tablesp. 356
10.1. The Standard Table Modelp. 356
10.2. Table Tagsp. 358
10.3. Newest Table Tagsp. 377
10.4. Beyond Ordinary Tablesp. 388
11. Framesp. 390
11.1. An Overview of Framesp. 390
11.2. Frame Tagsp. 391
11.3. Frame Layoutp. 393
11.4. Frame Contentsp. 399
11.5. The [noframes] Tagp. 402
11.6. Inline Framesp. 404
11.7. Named Frame or Window Targetsp. 406
12. Executable Contentp. 412
12.1. Applets and Objectsp. 412
12.2. Embedded Contentp. 416
12.3. JavaScriptp. 433
12.4. JavaScript Style Sheetsp. 441
13. Dynamic Documentsp. 449
13.1. An Overview of Dynamiic Documentsp. 449
13.2. Client-Pull Documentsp. 450
13.3. Server-Push Documentsp. 455
14. Netscape Layout Extensionsp. 460
14.1. Creating Whitespacep. 461
14.2. Multicolumn Layoutp. 466
14.3. Layersp. 472
15. XMLp. 484
15.1. Languages and Metalanguagesp. 485
15.2. Documents and DTDsp. 488
15.3. Understanding XML DTDsp. 489
15.4. Element Grammarp. 493
15.5. Element Attributesp. 498
15.6. Conditional Sectionsp. 500
15.7. Building an XML DTDp. 501
15.8. Using XMLp. 503
16. XHTMLp. 506
16.1. Why XHTML?p. 506
16.2. Creating XHTML Documentsp. 508
16.3. HTML Versus XHTMLp. 512
16.4. Should You Use XHTML?p. 517
17. Tips, Tricks, and Hacksp. 521
17.1. Top of the Tipsp. 521
17.2. Trivial or Abusive?p. 524
17.3. Custom Bulletsp. 524
17.4. Tricks with Tablesp. 525
17.5. Transparent Imagesp. 532
17.6. Tricks with Windows and Framesp. 535
A. HTML Grammarp. 539
B. HTML/XHTML Tag Quick Referencep. 551
C. Cascading Style Sheet Properties Quick Referencep. 582
D. The HTML 4.01 DTDp. 590
E. The XHTML 1.0 DTDp. 608
F. Character Entitiesp. 627
G. Color Names and Valuesp. 633
Indexp. 637

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