Cover image for Happy and honey
Title:
Happy and honey
Author:
Godwin, Laura.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Margaret K. McElderry Book, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Honey the cat is determined to play with Happy the dog, even though he is trying to sleep.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
BR 0 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 0.5 0.5 45497.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.2 1 Quiz: 26028 Guided reading level: C.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689834066
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library READER Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Readers
Searching...
Newstead Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Clarence Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Eggertsville-Snyder Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Elma Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Hamburg Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Kenmore Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Lake Shore Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Lancaster Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Lancaster Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Riverside Branch Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
City of Tonawanda Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Williamsville Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...
Audubon Library READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

For use in schools and libraries only. Happy is a big, friendly dog who likes to sleep. Can he be friends with Honey, a kitten who just wants to play?


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-2. Honey is a cat that likes to play. Happy is a dog that likes to sleep. This short text will make kids giggle as Honey tries to wake Happy to play ball, to play with a toy, and to give him a kiss. Honey would also like to wash Happy's tail. When Happy finally does wake up, a chase ensues--but it's a happy one. The text is short and effective, and the delightful acrylic paintings, which are set against an expanse of white space, center on Happy and Honey, keeping children as focused on the goings-on as does the just-right text. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Godwin's (Oh, Cats!) staccato narrative introduces a frisky kitten ("Meet Honey. Honey likes to play") and a drowsy dog ("Meet Happy. Happy likes to sleep"). In Happy and Honey, the kitten repeatedly attempts to rouse the dozing pooch, who finally awakens and plays with his feline friend. In the slightly cleverer second plot, Honey insists on helping Happy dig a hole to bury a bone. After Happy places the treasure in a "big hole," Honey digs a "little hole" and unearths the bone, which Happy is happy to see again. The limited vocabulary and intentional repetition may well make it easier for youngsters to recognize words but creates a certain monotonousness. As spare as the text, Chapman's (Dora's Eggs) acrylic pictures feature only the two characters on blank ground; this choice entails a limited palette and inescapable visual repetition. On the plus side, those just starting to read on their own will feel proud to be holding a volume with a trim size associated with chapter rather than picture books. Ages 2-5. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A new series about two appealing animal friends. In the first book, an energetic tiger-striped cat that loves to play tries to interest Happy, a brown-and-white dog that loves to sleep, in a variety of activities. Honey offers the dog a toy, gives a kiss, and then tries to wash the pooch's tail and nose, but is ignored. Finally, Happy wakes up and runs after the cat and the two companions play together. In the second title, Honey watches Happy chew on a bone and wants to help. However, the dog does not want to share the treat. When Happy digs a big hole, Honey digs a little one. After the bone is buried, the cat retrieves it and gives it back to Happy: "Happy Happy. Happy Honey!" Both books have simple story lines, with only two or three short sentences on each two-page spread. The acrylic paintings are bright and cheerful. The clean white backgrounds help to keep readers' attention focused on the antics of the two characters and on the large-print text. Good choices for youngsters just learning to read.-Wendy S. Carroll, Montclair Cooperative School, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview