Cover image for Power to the people : sunlight to electricity using solar cells
Title:
Power to the people : sunlight to electricity using solar cells
Author:
Green, Martin A.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Sydney, Australia : UNSW Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
93 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780868405544
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TK2960 .G727 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Traces the history of the development of photovoltaics, charts the current research priorities, and shows how solar energy is being tapped in a variety of innovative cases.


Author Notes

Martin Green is Scientia Professor and Director of the Photovoltaics Special Research Centre at the University of New South Wales.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Green (Univ. of New South Wales, Australia), in charge of the photovoltaic research center at the university, offers a short but current exposition of the state of the art in photovoltaic electrical generation. Because of falling costs and increasing environmental concerns, the promise of this technology is being realized in many unlikely places, such as in the Third World, where extending power lines is not economically feasible, and where electrical demand is modest and the present systems of kerosene lighting and battery-driven devices are expensive to operate. Small individual and village systems are being installed in Indonesia, China, India, Kenya, and Mexico. Numbers are approximate, but some 200,000 systems for lighting and communication are noted plus 10,000 solar-powered water pumps. As costs per kilowatt drop even further, more and more applications will emerge. One exciting development is in architectural glass for building facades, with solar cells integrated in the glass surface so the building can power itself! Though hardly exhaustive at 93 pages, it is a useful primer. Short glossary. General readers; undergraduates; two-year technical program students. J. C. Comer; emeritus, Northern Illinois University


Table of Contents

Prefacep. 6
1 Introductionp. 7
2 Quantum physics, semiconductors and solar cellsp. 13
3 The story so far: a history of photovoltaicsp. 22
4 Technological evolution: the thick and the thinp. 31
5 How can solar cells be used?p. 43
6 Photovoltaics on the family homep. 54
7 Architectural photovoltaicsp. 64
8 Energy for the developing worldp. 72
9 Power for the futurep. 85
Glossaryp. 87
Useful contactsp. 89
Indexp. 91

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