Cover image for When mules flew on Magnolia Street
Title:
When mules flew on Magnolia Street
Author:
Johnson, Angela.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2000.
Physical Description:
105 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
In the summertime Charlie goes fishing with her friends, investigates the mysterious disappearance of the entire Carter family, meets new neighbors, and finds that she and her older brother can be friends.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.6 2.0 44966.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780679890775

9780679990772
Format :
Book

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Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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East Delavan Branch Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

A new collection of stories by award-winning author Angela Johnson about Charlie and her adventures on Magnolia Street. It's summertime, and that means more adventures for Charlie and her friends on Magnolia Street in this collection of short stories by the author of Maniac Monkeys on Magnolia Street. There are lots of comings and goings on the block this summer. One family disappears, while another--the Magic Family--appears from nowhere. Charlie's best friends, Billy and Lump, go off to camp and have their own adventures, and Charlie meets Ashley, a girl who likes to grow things. But perhaps most amazing of all is that Charlie and her practical-joker older brother, Sid (her nemesis), actually join forces to help a neighbor in trouble. From the Hardcover Library Binding edition.


Author Notes

Angela Johnson was born on June 18, 1961 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She attended Kent State University and worked with Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) as a child development worker. She has written numerous children's books including Tell Me a Story, Mama, Shoes like Miss Alice, Looking for Red, A Cool Moonlight and Lily Brown's Paintings. She won the Coretta Scott King Author's Award three times for Toning the Sweep in 1994, for Heaven in 1999, and for The First Part Last in 2004, which also won the Michael L. Printz Award. In 2003, she was named a MacArthur fellow.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-4. Magnolia Street once again takes center stage in this easygoing, episodic story of Charlie and her friends, whose lives revolve around the everyday neighborhood occurrences that keep life there interesting. The kids go fishing, speculate wildly when a large family suddenly vacates their house, and watch with excitement when a new family, who turn out to be magicians, moves in. Then, while Charlie's best friends, Lump and Billy, are away at camp, she makes a new friend and helps an old one. Charlie's forthright personality energizes the first-person telling, while the small slices of life that are served up are just the right size for readers tackling their first real chapter book. --Denise Wilms


Publisher's Weekly Review

A sequel to Maniac Monkeys on Magnolia Street, this novel finds Charlie settled into her new neighborhood. She contentedly observes all the goings-on, including the arrival of two teenage girls and their father, a magician. Ages 7-10. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-In this beginning chapter book, Charlie, first introduced in Maniac Monkeys on Magnolia Street (Knopf, 1998), is back with her friends Billy and Lump. The three start their summer vacation in grand style; they spend their days fishing, solve the mystery of the missing Carter family, and meet some new neighbors. While Lump and Billy are off at camp, Charlie befriends a girl visiting her grandmother for the summer and teams up with her brother and father to come to the aid of Mr. Janks, the street vendor, when he becomes ill. Charlie's episodic first-person narrative is accessible and peopled with likable characters. Full-page, black-and-white pencil sketches, one or two to a chapter, illustrate the story. This book, which resonates with an innocence of an earlier era, is an appealing choice for newly independent readers.- Maria B. Salvadore, District of Columbia Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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