Cover image for Lost Chicago
Title:
Lost Chicago
Author:
Lowe, David, 1933-
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Revised and enlarged edition].
Publication Information:
New York : Watson-Guptill, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
vii, 261 pages : illustrations, maps ; 30 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780823028719
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library NA735.C4 L68 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

30th Anniversary These dazzling, poignant pages recreate the magical built environment that thrilled generations of Chicago residents and visitors alike before falling victim to the wrecking ball of "progress." Here are the grand residences and hotels, opulent theaters, legendary trains, and state-of-the-art office buildings and department stores--including the world's first skyscraper. Here too are the famous convention halls, parks, and racetracks of a great American city whose architectural treasures have been, and continue to be, recklessly squandered. Rare photographs and prints, many of them published here for the first time, document the transformative architectural achievements of such giants as Dankmar Adler, Louis Sullivan, John Wellburn Root, Daniel Burnham, William Holabird, and Frank Lloyd Wright. But this remarkable book is much more than a portfolio of now-vanished buildings; within its pages are evocative sketches of scores of Chicago personalities, from the world-famous (Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Dreiser, Clarence Darrow, Ben Hecht, Jane Addams, Cyrus McCormick, George Pullman, and Gustavus Swift, to name just a few) to the locally notorious. • "Lowe's oversized love letter to the city of his youth keeps their memory alive."--Forbes, Winter 2000 • "Lost Chicagocontain[s] 50 percent more photographs of demolished buildings than the 1975 original."--New York Times, November 12, 2000 • "As a once upon a windstorm native of that big burg on Lake Michigan, I got more than a little nostalgic reading the text and looking at the pictures inLost Chicago. A worthy work of David Garrard Lowe.... Now it is out again, revised in a soft cover version for Watson-Guptill Publications. Wonderful history recalled, lasting memories remain.... Glad I refoundLost Chicago."--Gary Stevens, syndicated columnist appearing in 62 papers nationwide • "The new revised edition ofLost Chicagois the subject of his lavishly illustrated lecture, organized in the form of an actual visit to long-gone structures in Chicago. The tour includes majestic hotels, legendary skyscrapers, glamorous old theaters, movie palaces that no longer exist and the fabulous mansions of Chicago families."--Friends of the Library, Key West, FL, Feb. 2001 • "Lowe's elegant, and informative text is wonderfully enhanced with more than 270 rare, period photos and prints (many of them published here for the first time).Lost Chicagois a must for students of Chicago history, architecture, and personalities."--The Bookwatch


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Lowe's evangelistic eulogy of Chicago's destroyed architecture was a rallying cry for historic preservationists when it appeared in 1975, and it remains an icon to the movement. In the preface to this new edition, Lowe laments that, sadly, further demolition of Chicago's built heritage warrants a recapitulation. Additions include newly discovered illustrations of earlier losses as well as images of more recent ones, textual revisions (particularly regarding captions), and a final chapter that brings the work to the present. The vanished glories of Chicago residences, railways, hotels, commercial buildings, and entertainment palaces are thematically and chronologically exposed, along with a great deal of city history. Lowe is a rousing polemicist, and the photographs are wrenching. Readers today will be moved, as they first were a quarter of a century ago, by this documentary of the Windy City's ransacking. Strongly recommended for architecture, urbanism, and preservation collections, including those holding the original edition, which could likely use a facelift.DRussell T. Clement, Northwestern Univ. Lib., Evanston, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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