Cover image for The other dog
Title:
The other dog
Author:
L'Engle, Madeleine.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : SeaStar Books, 2001.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
The family poodle protests at first when the master and mistress bring home a new "dog" to share the household.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 540 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.0 0.5 47342.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.1 2 Quiz: 24508 Guided reading level: NR.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781587170409

9781587170416
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Touche L'Engle-Franklin is confused: Her mistress goes away for several daysand then returns with another dog. But this dog doesn't have a tail. She doesn't have much hair. And she never has to go outside when it's raining. What on earth could the family want with that inferior breed known as Baby?

Based on the true tale of her own poodle's experience coping with a new baby in the house, Newbery-winning author Madeleine L'Engle gives this familiar domestic drama an utterly charming new twist. Tongue-in-cheek wit, endearing illustrations, and a revealing author's note make this a publishing event to celebrate.


Author Notes

Author Madeleine L'Engle was born in New York City on November 29, 1918. She graduated from Smith College. She is best known for A Wrinkle in Time (1962), which won the 1963 Newbery Medal for best American children's book. While many of her novels blend science fiction and fantasy, she has also written a series of autobiographical books, including Two Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage, which deals with the illness and death of her husband, soap opera actor Hugh Franklin. In 2004, she received a National Humanities Medal from President George W. Bush. She died on September 6, 2007 of natural causes.

Since 1976, Wheaton College in Illinois has maintained a special collection of L'Engle's papers, and a variety of other materials, dating back to 1919.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-6. L'Engle, best known for books for an older crowd, turns her attention to the preschool audience in this delightful offering. Touchethe poodle isn't pleased when a new dog joins the family. It's bad enough that the newcomer shares the spotlight; she also gets fed several times a day and does her business in something called a diaper. In persuasive first person, Toucheargues her own case. She's talented, smart, and very good-looking, "So why another dog?" she asks in a plaintive refrain. The text and art have a retro feel that works well and gives the book an unusual look. The oversize format, with plenty of white space, allows room for Toucheto roam, which she does with zest, and the watercolors, highlighted by spiral ink lines, are full of energy and movement. Young listeners, who will get the joke that Touchemisses, will find this very funny; adults who read L'Engle's note about her relationship with the real Touchewill be touched. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

HReaders raised on L'Engle's thoughtful novels (A Wrinkle in Time) will discover a new side of the writer in this impish, tongue-in-cheek memoir. Ostensibly the L'Engle family poodle's account of the arrival of a new baby (whom she thinks an odd sort of dog), Touch L'Engle-Franklin's narrative is enlivened by genteel dismay and the generous use of italics: "From the start I noticed a great many mysterious and horrifying things. For instance, when I am taken out to get some fresh air I always have to walk even when it rains. The Jo is taken out in a carriage, and when it rains she doesn't have to go out at all." The poodle softens enough by the end of the story to admit that the family might, after all, be better off with "two dogs." Davenier (Leon and Albertine) conveys the expressions and attitudes of the exasperated poodle with calligraphic wit; the family's 1950s-era Manhattan apartment is evoked in her ink-and-wash drawings with such warmth and immediacy that readers can almost hear the radiators hissing. In concert with the sprightly typeface, Davenier's illustrations give the book an engaging retro feel, but the closing shot of dog and baby nestled together for a nap is timeless. Any family with a cosseted dog and a new baby will feel this is written just for them. Ages 5-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-A whimsical look at sibling rivalry from a canine point of view. When her mistress brings home a new baby girl, the resident dog, a stylish and articulate poodle, experiences several stages of adjustment (disbelief, disdain, acceptance, and finally affection). Children will revel in the distaste Touch‚ expresses over the obvious inferiority of the newcomer while extolling her own virtues. Her observations are pointed, but because they are comparisons between dog and human, and humorously colored by her canine perspective, they are witty but never mean-spirited. Likewise, her eventual conclusion that "in every home there should be at least two dogs" is genuinely satisfying. The high-spirited, lolloping text is perfectly complemented by the illustrations and overall design. Watercolors reminiscent of the work of Ludwig Bemelmans or Marjorie Priceman follow the dog as she sulks, scowls, and snuggles her way across the pages of rich cream stock. Color, tone, and composition are used to evoke the mood and period. Effective use of font size and design underscores the conversational tone of the tale while enhancing the visual appeal. The extensive author's note relating the facts of Touch‚'s eccentric and fascinating life adds appeal and rich background to the narrative. Colored-pencil drawings by the author, contemporary to the story, provide a fitting final flair.-Starr LaTronica, Four County Library System, Vestal, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.