Cover image for In the still of the night : tales to lock your doors by
Title:
In the still of the night : tales to lock your doors by
Author:
Davis, Dorothy Salisbury.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Unity, Me. : Five Star, 2001.
Physical Description:
214 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
To forget Mary Ellen -- Now is forever -- The puppet -- Justina -- Christopher and Maggie -- The scream -- Till death do us part -- Miles to go.
ISBN:
9780786230075
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

To forget Mary Ellen -- Now is forever -- The puppet -- Justina -- Christopher and Maggie -- The scream -- Till death do us part -- Miles to go.


Author Notes

Dorothy Salisbury Davis was born on April 25, 1916. She received a degree in literature from Barat College in 1938. In the depths of the Depression, she got a job as a magician's assistant. She later worked in public relations for a meatpacking company before becoming an author. During her lifetime, she wrote 17 crime novels, three historical novels, and many short stories. Her works included A Gentle Murderer, the Julie Hayes Mysteries series, and Black Sheep, White Lamb. She received a lifetime achievement award from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1986, she helped found Sisters in Crime. She died on August 3, 2014 at the age of 98.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

The veteran mystery novelist--her first novel was published in 1949--turns in an excellent performance in this collection of stories originally published between 1986 and 1998. Two of the stories feature Julie Hayes, the newspaper columnist and part-time sleuth who's appeared in several novels, but the rest will be unfamiliar to those of the author's fans who have only read her longer works. They\qll meet a magician who chances upon a murder victim; a man whose conscience won\qt let him drive away from a road accident; a woman who unwittingly picks up an unusual hitch-hiker; and other troubled folks. Since the stories are fairly long--there are only eight of them, in a book of more than 280 pages--Davis is able to develop her characters fully and make each story nearly as detailed as a novel. Fans of her novels will no doubt be equally pleased with these shorter pieces, and short-story aficionados will enjoy this opportunity to see what one of the genre's grand masters can do with the form. --David Pitt