Cover image for Art fraud detective
Title:
Art fraud detective
Author:
Nilsen, Anna, 1948-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Kingfisher, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
A spot-the-difference game, mystery story, and art book in which readers try to tell which paintings are genuine and which are forgeries. Includes magnifying glass and split-page format.
General Note:
"Published in association with the National Gallery Company Limited, London, U.K."--T.p. verso.
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780753453087
Format :
Book

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ND1660 .N55 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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ND1660 .N55 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

The Museum of Art has a big problem. Some of the museum's priceless masterpieces have been stolen and replaced by cunning forgeries! Are your eyes sharp enough to spot the differences between the fake and the real Rousseau? Hone your detective skills and find the tell-tale clues that will help the police track down the master forgers, and bring back the missing masterpieces. This one-of-a-kind book combines a mystery story, fun spot-the-difference puzzles, and a fantastic introduction to someof the world's greatest art. Guaranteed to enthrall children of all ages, Art Fraud Detective includes historical information on each painting, tips on the techniques of the Old Masters, and a glossary of art terms. Features art by: Rembrandt; Constable; Monet; Picasso; Raphael; Van Gogh; and more!


Author Notes

Anna Nilsen is a former art history teacher and a prizewinning artist. She devised Kingfisher's highly successful Art Fraud Detective, The Great Art Scandal, I Can Spell, and I Can Count titles.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. Children who like hunting for small differences in detailed pictures may enjoy this large-format book, produced in association with England's National Gallery. In the framework story, a security guard at "the Museum of Art," which happens to have a fine collection of 34 European masterpieces, asks young readers to play detective. He has just received a call telling him that 30 of these works are fakes. By closely comparing the museum's paintings with pictures of the originals, readers can discover which are real and (since each forger leaves a distinctive trademark) who made each forgery. The reproduction of the paintings is excellent, and the paragraphs of information about the paintings, by artists such as Botticelli, Holbein, da Vinci, Picasso, Turner, and van Gogh, are well-written and entertaining. It remains to be seen, though, whether children will have the patience to match both versions of the painting, search for the tiny clues, and draw conclusions about the forgers. Still, an original effort in art appreciation. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-A clever "spot the difference" book that also serves as a good introduction to art history. Using a comic-strip format, Nilsen alerts readers to the fact that 30 of these 34 paintings are fakes. A double spread identifies the 16 suspected forgers, the symbol their particular gang hides on each forgery, and the number of changes (one to four) they deliberately added to each painting. The premise is to figure out which character forged which classic piece, and to determine which one of them snitched. The paintings, which include Georges Seurat's Bathers at AsniŠres and Vincent van Gogh's Sunflowers, are ingeniously depicted in their original and altered forms on split pages featuring the forgeries above and the museum catalog below. Readers are supposed to match up the forger with the artwork (a magnifying glass enables them to verify their detective work). The catalog pages briefly describe the artists' lives, their work, and the showcased piece. This approach should prove popular; it's something of a Where's Waldo (Candlewick) for older children. Although the paintings date from the 15th to the 20th century, no American artwork is presented.-Carol Fazioli, formerly at The Brearley School, New York City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.