Cover image for Fiona McGilray's story : a voyage from Ireland in 1849
Title:
Fiona McGilray's story : a voyage from Ireland in 1849
Author:
Pastore, Clare.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Berkley Jam, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
184 pages ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
570 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.2 5.0 82199.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.7 11 Quiz: 23922 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780425177839
Format :
Book

Available:*

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X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Kicking off the Journey to America book series is this story of a young Irish girl who arrives in Boston in 1849 with her brother. In a series of letters to her parents back home, Fiona describes her life in America, how she searches for family members there, and her experiences in making a new friend.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-8. Books in the Journey to America series chronicle the adventures of girls immigrating to America from different parts of the world at different times in history. Fiona McGilray's Story is the first in the series, and it tells the story of a young girl, Fiona, and her brother who emigrate to escape the Irish potato famine. Fiona is an almost preternaturally strong, brave, and lucky girl. In Ireland she saved her brother from a bull and arranged to free corn held back by British landlords. What's more, after being in America only a short time, she's taken under the wing of a lonely, wealthy woman and shortly thereafter finds her own wealthy cousins. The story, which touches briefly on the more common and difficult experiences of Irish immigrants, is both engaging and well written. The characters are admirable role models, but to give children a real feeling of the times, pair the novel with some of the more realistic accounts of the immigrant experience. --Marta Segal