Cover image for Pooh goes visiting
Title:
Pooh goes visiting
Author:
Milne, A. A. (Alan Alexander), 1882-1956.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations ; 28 cm
General Note:
Original copyright date 1926.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780525464570
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

What Pooh lover can forget when Winnie-the-Pooh visits Rabbit, eats too much, and gets stuck in the doorway? Or when Eeyore loses his tail and Pooh sets out to find it for him? Now these two favorite Pooh stories are available as 32-page, full-color storybooks that feature high-quality cloth spines, foil stamping, and a look that is both classic and lively.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 2. Each book in the Winnie-the-Pooh Easy Reader series features one chapter from Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh or The House at Pooh Corner. The chapter is shortened, divided into four small sections, and formatted for beginning readers. In Pooh Goes Visiting, Pooh enjoys a repast in Rabbit's hole, but he becomes stuck in the doorway on his way out. In Tigger Comes to the Forest, Pooh discovers Tigger on his doorstep and takes him out to meet the other residents of the Hundred Acre Wood and find something that he likes for breakfast. Krensky does a good and sensitive job of gently adapting the language for beginning readers. He simplifies sentence structures and leaves out some phrases, while sticking to the essentials. Although some of the humor and cadence of Milne's original prose is lost, the simplified texts are better than might be expected. An ink-and-watercolor picture by Shepard, pulled from the original books, appears on nearly every page. --Carolyn Phelan