Cover image for Africa is not a country
Title:
Africa is not a country
Author:
Knight, Margy Burns.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Brookfield, Conn. : Millbrook Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
39 pages : color illustrations, color map ; 29 cm
Summary:
Demonstrates the diversity of the African continent by describing daily life in some of its fifty-three nations.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.3 0.5 45401.
ISBN:
9780761312666
Format :
Book

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DT22 .K57 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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DT22 .K57 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DT22 .K57 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Oversize
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Summary

Summary

People tend to look at Africa as a place with certain characteristics rather than as a diverse continent made up of many countries with their own customs. From the beauty of the plains to the skyscrapers of the major cities, this boo follows the activities of children in various countries are followed. Illustrations.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 6^-8. The title says it all. Instead of the "vanishing tribes" view of one Africa with tourists from different countries photographing the animals and primitive people, this informative picture book celebrates the diversity of the 53 nations that make up the continent today. On each page there's a quick vignette of children in one country, with a bright, happy, colorful illustration. Three girls in school uniform walk on Cairo's jammed city sidewalks. A boy in Nigeria practices the ancient Igbo dances. At the back a small note on each country fills in facts about geography, currency, population, etc. There's still the danger of generalization (kids in Kenya running to school), and there are minor inaccuracies (South Africa's Freedom Day dates from 1994, not 1974); but readers will want to go on from here to explore in depth particular countries that interest them. The essential differences and connections are here. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-The authors narrate the experiences of children at play, at school, and at home, and use realistic illustrations to explore the cultural, environmental, ethnic, and social diversity of the 53 countries that make up the African continent. They explain that in Rwanda, refugee children (many of whom have been orphaned) are making pictures of war, while in Kenya, two children race to school, dreaming of one day becoming professional runners. From vast deserts with camels in the North to lush agricultural lands in Central and Southern Africa, the widely varied terrains are described in a paragraph or two of text. Unfortunately, there are no chapter or subtopic headings to indicate immediately what country is being discussed, and there is no indication of where it is located on the continent, so it's difficult to find it on the map. While the art is lively and colorful, and the book concludes with an alphabetical listing of the countries and facts about them, this offering does have its drawbacks.-Daniel Mungai, Queens Borough Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.