Cover image for The giving box : [create a tradition of giving with your children]
Title:
The giving box : [create a tradition of giving with your children]
Author:
Rogers, Fred.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia : Running Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
95 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm + 1 tin giving box bank.
Summary:
"Neighbors are people who care about each other. It's such a good feeling to know that you can give and receive help!"
General Note:
"Mister Rogers' neighborhood."
Language:
English
Added Uniform Title:
Mister Rogers' neighborhood (Television program)
ISBN:
9780762408252
Format :
Book

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BJ1533.G4 R64 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Parenting
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Summary

Summary

The notion that charity begins at home has never been easier to teach children than with this enchanting gift set based on the Jewish tradition of tzadakah, in which children save coins in banks for the less fortunate. Added inspiration for contributing to worthy causes comes from Emmy Award-winning television personality Mister Rogers, whose peaceful "neighborhood" has been a comforting presence in millions of homes for more than 25 years.In the book that accompanies THE GIVING BOX, Mister Rogers teaches lessons of generosity and charity through heartwarming fictional stories set in countries around the world. For children, he describes how good it feels to give to those less fortunate, and reveals how even one child's contribution can make a difference. For parents, he offers wise suggestions and practical guidelines on teaching children the moral lesson of compassion for others and the value of charity.


Author Notes

Fred McFeely Rogers was born on March 20, 1928 in Pennsylvania. He was an American television personality, educator, Presbyterian minister, composer, songwriter, author, and activist. Rogers was most famous for creating, hosting, and composing the theme music for the educational preschool television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (1968 - 2001), which featured his gentle, soft-spoken personality. Originally he was educated to be a minister but was displeased with the way television addressed children and made an effort to change this when he began to write for and perform on local Pittsburgh-area shows dedicated to youth. WQED developed his own show in 1968 and it was distributed nationwide by Eastern Educational Television Network. Over the course of three decades on television, Fred Rogers became an indelible American icon of children's entertainment and education, as well as a symbol of compassion, patience, and morality.

Rogers received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, some forty honorary degrees, and a Peabody Award. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame, was recognized by two Congressional resolutions, and was ranked No. 35 among TV Guide's Fifty Greatest TV Stars of All Time.[5] Several buildings and artworks in Pennsylvania are dedicated to his memory, and the Smithsonian Institution displays one of his trademark sweaters as a "Treasure of American History".

Rogers was diagnosed with stomach cancer in December 2002, not long after his retirement. He underwent surgery on January 6, 2003, which was unsuccessful. Rogers died on the morning of February 27, 2003, at his home with his wife by his side, less than a month before he would have turned 75.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Fred Rogers, the host of Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood, helps parents to teach children lessons of generosity and community with The Giving Box, illus. by Jennifer Herbert, designed to "create a tradition of giving with your children." A hand-size hardcover comes packaged with a small painted tin bank in which children can save coins to donate to the needy. The book contains fables from around the world that convey a tradition of giving (e.g., the Hebrew tale of "The Brothers," about two siblings who secretly help each other without the other's knowledge; Aesop's "The Lion and the Mouse"), as well as a letter to parents, a letter to children and instructions on how to use the boxÄnot just at Christmastime but year round. (Running Press, $12.95 96p ages 7-up ISBN 0-7624-0825-1; Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved