Cover image for One foot on the floor : the curious evolution of sex on television from I love Lucy to South Park
Title:
One foot on the floor : the curious evolution of sex on television from I love Lucy to South Park
Author:
Chunovic, Louis.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York TV Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
216 pages, 22 unnumbered pages of plates ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781575001869

9781575001265
Format :
Book

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PN1992.3.U5 C44 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

journalist and television critic, traces the curious rise and rise of sex on the small screen, from I Love Lucy to South Park. He details the story of television's attempts to keep audiences riveted without offending important segments of it. He highlights the shows and the moments that raised the temperature of television and broadened what was permissible for public viewing -- from shows like All in the Family and Ally McBeal to moments like Elvis's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show.At the leading edge of the twenty-first century, the same winds of sensationalism and censorship that have always buffeted television are rising. Chunovic examines how the need to compete in an ever-more crowded entertainment market and the V-chip will continue to push TV sex in new directions.One Foot on the Floor is a riveting social history, providing the answer to the question: How did that make it past the censors?


Summary

Chunovic guides readers on a family-values-friendly trip down TV lover's lane, with peeks along the way into the private life of such favorites as Hot Lips and the M*A*S*H gang, and much more. 70 photos.


Author Notes

Louis Chunovic is the former television editor of the Hollywood Reporter, the former managing editor of On Production magazine, and the former on-air entertainment reporter for Fox Television in Los Angeles


Louis Chunovic is the former television editor of the Hollywood Reporter, the former managing editor of On Production magazine, and the former on-air entertainment reporter for Fox Television in Los Angeles


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Chunovic's breezy report is chockablock with chuckles, thanks to the details. For instance, the time Jerry Seinfeld couldn't remember his date's name; however, knowing it rhymed "with a female body part," he called her Dolores Mulva. Then as now, that's amusing, but what is its significance? For the most part, Chunovic just notes the cultural milestones in re sex on the small screen. He finds All in the Family "the most significant [show] in the great history of sex on television" and amply considers the tightrope the networks walked in trying to titillate without offending the masses. But he doesn't muse about what all the jiggles and giggles portended. Of course, since the advent of cable, all bets have been off. The best thing about this book is its perusal of sex in the viewing menu over the years. Dividing the TV era into decades, Chunovic recalls the classic, the classy, and the crass with anecdotal gusto. So get this for the coverage; appreciate it for the naughty memories. --Mike Tribby


Library Journal Review

The depiction of sex on television has always been controversial, and this book proves that it has also never been boring. Chunovic, a veteran TV reporter, author (Northern Exposure: The Book), and journalist (Hollywood Reporter), unfolds the history of sex on TV, using examples that span more than 40 years, from television's innocent beginnings in the 1950s to the medium's blatant sensationalism of the 1990s and beyond. He illustrates that, over the decades, network censors, parent groups, TV-rating guides, and cable TV premium channel services have often dictated what is deemed acceptable. One of the only volumes of its kind on the subject, this compact, up-to-date book is breezy, enlightening, and entertaining. Recommended for academic and public libraries with popular TV and media sections.DDavid M. Lisa, Mercyhurst Coll. Lib., Erie, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Chunovic's breezy report is chockablock with chuckles, thanks to the details. For instance, the time Jerry Seinfeld couldn't remember his date's name; however, knowing it rhymed "with a female body part," he called her Dolores Mulva. Then as now, that's amusing, but what is its significance? For the most part, Chunovic just notes the cultural milestones in re sex on the small screen. He finds All in the Family "the most significant [show] in the great history of sex on television" and amply considers the tightrope the networks walked in trying to titillate without offending the masses. But he doesn't muse about what all the jiggles and giggles portended. Of course, since the advent of cable, all bets have been off. The best thing about this book is its perusal of sex in the viewing menu over the years. Dividing the TV era into decades, Chunovic recalls the classic, the classy, and the crass with anecdotal gusto. So get this for the coverage; appreciate it for the naughty memories. --Mike Tribby


Library Journal Review

The depiction of sex on television has always been controversial, and this book proves that it has also never been boring. Chunovic, a veteran TV reporter, author (Northern Exposure: The Book), and journalist (Hollywood Reporter), unfolds the history of sex on TV, using examples that span more than 40 years, from television's innocent beginnings in the 1950s to the medium's blatant sensationalism of the 1990s and beyond. He illustrates that, over the decades, network censors, parent groups, TV-rating guides, and cable TV premium channel services have often dictated what is deemed acceptable. One of the only volumes of its kind on the subject, this compact, up-to-date book is breezy, enlightening, and entertaining. Recommended for academic and public libraries with popular TV and media sections.DDavid M. Lisa, Mercyhurst Coll. Lib., Erie, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. 9
The Author's Apologiap. 11
The Biz: What It Was, How It Isp. 15
The Fifties: Plunging Necklines, Lucy, and the King of Rock and Rollp. 27
The Sixties: The Great Wasteland, from Hooterville to Peyton Placep. 45
The Seventies: All in the Family, M*A*S*H, and The Ugly George Hour of Truth, Sex, and Violencep. 59
The Eighties: Hill Street, Cheers, Bickering P.I.s, and MTV Copsp. 83
The Nineties: Jerry to Tony and Cicely to South Parkp. 125
The Future of Television: Liking to Look, Looking to Convergep. 175
Afterwordp. 199
Citationsp. 201
Indexp. 205
About the Authorp. 215
Acknowledgmentsp. 9
The Author's Apologiap. 11
The Biz: What It Was, How It Isp. 15
The Fifties: Plunging Necklines, Lucy, and the King of Rock and Rollp. 27
The Sixties: The Great Wasteland, from Hooterville to Peyton Placep. 45
The Seventies: All in the Family, M*A*S*H, and The Ugly George Hour of Truth, Sex, and Violencep. 59
The Eighties: Hill Street, Cheers, Bickering P.I.s, and MTV Copsp. 83
The Nineties: Jerry to Tony and Cicely to South Parkp. 125
The Future of Television: Liking to Look, Looking to Convergep. 175
Afterwordp. 199
Citationsp. 201
Indexp. 205
About the Authorp. 215