Cover image for You and me
Title:
You and me
Author:
Manna, Giovanni.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Barefoot Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
A boy and a girl play an imaginary game, picturing themselves as opposites.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781841482637
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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On Order

Summary

Summary

With simple language and illustrations, You and Me celebrates the many ways humans relate to one another with the story of a boy and girl who play an imaginary game picturing themselves as different characters.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-6. A girl and a boy take on a variety of different characteristics to demonstrate opposites in this attractively illustrated picture book. Valley and hill, moving and still, wild and tame, sunshine and rain are just some of the concepts depicted in a series of double-page spreads featuring the girl engaged in one activity on the right-hand page, and the boy doing something else on the left: "You're moving." "I'm still." Manna's realistic and imaginative, nicely detailed watercolor-and-ink illustrations are well rendered, and each scene has an inch-thick border of related images for added visual interest. Although each spread comprises two distinctly different scenes, the illustrations appear connected because the children are usually making eye contact or exhibiting other body language that ties things together. The book will probably appeal most to younger children, but it contains a few abstract concepts that can be explored with older kids. --Lauren Peterson


Publisher's Weekly Review

Manna (Someone I Like) makes the most of Blackstone's (Bear in a Square; Bear About Town) deceptively simple text in a playful exploration of opposites. He creates a stage of sorts, for a boy and girl who perform each couplet. For "I'm a circle,/ You're a square," the left-hand page features a girl in a red dress striking a "ta-da" pose, encircled by a ring of blue on a yellow background; Manna then frames her in a border of geometric shapes cast in an array of colors. Meanwhile, on the right-hand page, the boy looks over at her, a red square behind him, with a similar border of geometric shapes. For "I'm a valley/ You're a hill," the girl, lying in the lower left-hand corner of her framed vignette, looks across the gutter at the boy perched on a hilltop that rivals those pictured in Saint-Exup‚ry's The Little Prince. A few of the antonyms in the narrative are a stretch (tiger/bear and tree/flower), but Manna's delicate, penumbral watercolors retain a timeless, fairytale quality, depicting enchanted forests populated by castles and towers; the scenery underscores the feeling of the boy and girl playing various parts in their own imaginative play. The audience will appreciate Manna's theatrical approach to wordplay. Ages 2-6. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-This picture book attempts to explore the concept of opposites, as two children play a game of pretend. The first double spread reads, "I'm a circle/You're a square," and the ink-and-watercolor artwork shows the girl standing in front of a circle on the left-hand page and the boy in front of a square on the right. "You're moving/I'm still" is illustrated by the girl jumping rope and the boy sitting in a yoga position. Although listeners may enjoy the gently rhyming text, there are some problems here. It is often difficult to tell which character is speaking. Also many of the opposites are far-fetched: "You're a tiger/I'm a bear"; "I'm a valley/You're a hill"; "You're a cave/I'm a tower." In the illustrations for all of these pairings, the boy and girl give each other smiling, sidelong glances that are oddly intense and a bit unsettling. Better introductions to opposites abound.-Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.