Cover image for Flora the frog
Title:
Flora the frog
Author:
Isherwood, Shirley.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Atlanta : Peachtree, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
When picked to be a frog in the class play, Flora does not like her role until she spies real frogs jumping and sparkling in the pond.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 43540.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781561452231
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Oversize
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Flora is asked to be a frog in the class play, but she is dismayed. Frogs are green and fat, and she is afraid that everyone will laugh at her. When her mother and Aunt Jo make a frog costume for her, Flora promptly throws it up into a tree.All day long she watches the frog's hand, which is hanging off a branch, sway in the breeze. To make matters worse, later that day she lies to her mother that all her friends liked the costume.Flora is troubled by her own behavior and angrily throws her ball over the backyard fence. When she goes to retrieve it, she makes a remarkable discovery. The ball has landed next to a pond where three frogs sit, sparkling with water drops. She watches the frogs and loves how they sparkle and leap. Slowly she realizes that being a frog in the play may not be so bad after all.Shirley Isherwood shows young readers that a little imagination can make anything--even a fat, green frog--special and fun. Illustrator Anna C. Leplar's joyous watercolors bring the appealing characters to life.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-8. Flora's teacher assigns roles for the class play, which is about animals who live in a forest. Flora thinks everyone else gets to be cool creatures, like squirrels and rabbits, while she's stuck being a frog. The beautiful frog costume made by her mother and aunt gets thrown away. But later, while observing frogs in a pond, Flora sees how water sparkles on the backs of the frogs. Back at home, Flora confesses about the costume but tells her mother that adding shiny spangles from the sewing box would make Flora proud to retrieve and wear her frog suit. Together, they sew on spangles while Flora beams. This pleasant picture book offers a child who takes responsibility for what she does and thinks through her problems. Leplar's watercolors capture Flora's many emotions while presenting a safe, comforting world where children are allowed to vent. --Kathy Broderick


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Flora is dejected when she is given the role of a frog in the class play. Frogs are green and ugly with fat green tummies and long green legs and she would much rather be a fairy with wings or an elf with bells on her shoes. Even though her mother and Aunt Jo make her a wonderful costume, she is still unhappy, and gets rid of the frog suit by throwing it up into the branches of a tree. There it torments her conscience by flapping and waving at her. After school, Flora tells her mother that everyone liked the costume. Feeling guilty about her lie, she goes outside to play and observes some frogs in a pond. Seeing how they sparkle in the water, she has an epiphany: spangles can be sewn onto her outfit. After she confesses all through a deluge of tears, Flora, her mother, and Aunt Jo retrieve the costume and add a few sequins, much to the girl's delight. Children will relate to Flora's feelings, due in particular to the large, full-page pen-and-watercolor illustrations that wonderfully depict her emotions. Although the book is a bit didactic and predictable, it should serve as a starting point for discussions about lying and feelings.-Piper L. Nyman, Fairfield/Suisun Community Library, Fairfield, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.