Cover image for Emissions and air quality
Title:
Emissions and air quality
Author:
Lenz, Hans Peter.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Warrendale, Pa. : Society of Automotive Engineers, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiii, 125 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780768002485
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This book evaluates the current worldwide state of knowledge about the interrelationship between emissions and air quality. This study describes the contribution of passenger car and commercial vehicle traffic to local and global emission situations, and the consequences for the environment.


Author Notes

Prof.Dipl.-Ing.Dr.Techn. Hans Peter Lenz was born in Bonn in 1934. Dr. Lenz studied mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Aachen and at the Federal Technical University in Zurich. He worked at various automotive companies for ten years. Since 1974, Dr. Lenz has been professor and director of the Institute for Internal Combustion Engines and Automotive Engineering at the Technical University of Vienna
Dipl.-Ing.Dr.Techn. Christian Cozzarini was born in Vienna in 1969 and studied mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Vienna. From 1995 to 1999, Dr. Cozzarini was assistant at the Institute for Internal Combustion Engines and Automotive Engineering at the Technical University of Vienna


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Lenz and Cozzarini offer a useful and accessible summary of the emissions of environmentally damaging trace gases and particles from motor vehicles and comparisons with the magnitude of emissions from other anthropogenic and natural sources. Unfortunately, the authors do not describe how these emissions arise from vehicles using internal combustion engines, nor do they address uncertainties inherent in emission estimates. Nevertheless, the high quality of their data successfully demonstrates both recent improvements in vehicle technology to reduce unwanted emissions and examples of how emission control measures implemented to date have been reflected in declining ambient concentrations of gases such as carbon monoxide in European cities. They also provide a chapter that summarizes the potential for further emission reductions that could result from fuel reformulation, modification of driving style, and modified traffic management schemes. In producing this book the authors have summarized a large number of articles and reports. However, a large fraction of the references cited are available only in German, a possible limitation to the utility of the book as a starting point for more in-depth review for those not able to read that language. General readers; undergraduates; two-year technical program students. S. C. Pryor; Indiana University


Table of Contents

Abstractp. xi
Chapter 1 Introduction--Objective of the Studyp. 1
Chapter 2 The Basicsp. 3
2.1 Effects of Air Polluting Substances on the Atmospherep. 3
2.2 Evaluation Methodology--Critical Consideration or Resultsp. 5
2.3 Difference Between Substances with Local and Global Effects on the Atmospherep. 5
Chapter 3 Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations of Substances with Global Effectsp. 7
3.1 The Greenhouse Effectp. 7
3.2 Stratospheric Ozone Depletionp. 12
3.2.1 Water Vaporp. 13
3.2.2 Carbon Dioxidep. 14
3.2.3 Halogenated Hydrocarbonsp. 19
3.2.4 Methanep. 23
3.2.5 Nitrous Oxidep. 25
Chapter 4 Exhaust Emission Components with Local and Regional Effectsp. 31
4.1 Nitrogen Oxidesp. 32
4.1.1 Nitrogen Oxide Emissions in Europep. 33
4.1.2 Nitrogen Oxide Emissions in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 36
4.1.3 Judgment Criteria for the Impact of Nitrogen Oxides on Air Qualityp. 37
4.1.4 Concentrations of Nitrogen Oxides in the Atmospherep. 39
4.2 Non-Methane Hydrocarbonsp. 40
4.2.1 Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions in Europep. 41
4.2.2 Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 42
4.2.3 Concentrations of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in the Atmospherep. 44
4.3 Sulfur Dioxidep. 44
4.3.1 Sulfur Dioxide Emissions in Europep. 45
4.3.2 Sulfur Dioxide Emissions in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 46
4.3.3 Judgment Criteria for the Impact of Sulfur Dioxide on Air Qualityp. 48
4.3.4 Concentrations of Sulfur Dioxide in the Atmospherep. 50
4.4 Dust and Particulate Matterp. 52
4.4.1 Airborne Dust Emissions in Europep. 53
4.4.2 Airborne Dust Emissions in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 54
4.4.3 Judgment Criteria for the Impact of Airborne Dust on Air Qualityp. 55
4.4.4 Concentrations of Airborne Dust in the Atmospherep. 58
4.5 Carbon Monoxidep. 60
4.5.1 Carbon Monoxide Emissions in Europep. 60
4.5.2 Carbon Monoxide Emissions in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 61
4.5.3 Judgment Criteria for the Impact of Carbon Monoxide on Air Qualityp. 63
4.5.4 Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide in the Atmospherep. 63
4.6 Ozonep. 64
4.6.1 Judgment Criteria for the Impact of Ozone on Air Qualityp. 65
4.6.2 Concentrations of Ozone in the Atmospherep. 66
4.7 Benzenep. 68
4.7.1 Benzene Emissions in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 69
4.7.2 Judgment Criteria for the Impact of Benzene on Air Qualityp. 69
4.7.3 Concentrations of Benzene in the Atmospherep. 71
4.8 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbonsp. 72
4.8.1 Concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Atmospherep. 73
Chapter 5 Possible Ways to Influence Emissions from Road Traffic--Emission Scenariosp. 75
5.1 Calculation Model for Determining Emissions from Passenger Car and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Traffic in the Federal Republic of Germanyp. 76
5.2 Legislative Measuresp. 83
5.2.1 Level of Emission Standardsp. 83
5.2.2 In-Use Vehicle Emissionsp. 87
5.2.3 Fuel Compositionp. 89
5.2.4 Testing of In-Use Vehiclesp. 95
5.3 Vehicle Userp. 96
5.4 Traffic Managementp. 98
Chapter 6 Literaturep. 101
Indexp. 115
About the Authorsp. 125