Cover image for Elizabeth Blackwell : the first woman doctor
Title:
Elizabeth Blackwell : the first woman doctor
Author:
Peck, Ira.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Brookfield, CT : Millbrook Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
48 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Summary:
A biography of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to attend medical school and practice medicine in the United States, and also discussing her careers in Paris and London, and the medical colleges she helped establish.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.2 1.0 47226.
ISBN:
9780761318545
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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East Aurora Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Hamburg Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Kenmore Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Lake Shore Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Williamsville Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Audubon Library R154.B623 P43 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

A fascinating and inspiring story of a woman who was ahead of her time. Born in Bristol, England, in the 1820s, Elizabeth Blackwell emigrated to the US when she was young and made history by becoming the first woman to earn a medical degree. Her long career included the founding of two hospitals and a medical college for women.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-5. Blackwell, the first woman to graduate from a medical school in the U.S., is a popular subject for children's biographies. This concise account of her heroic life and works falls nicely between Carol Greene's Elizabeth Blackwell (1991) and Jordan Brown's Elizabeth Blackwell (1989) in its level of detail. Adding occasional speculative fillips ("Elizabeth blushed a deep red," "Elizabeth felt lonely," etc), Peck presents his information in a fluent, coherent way, providing additional detail in text boxes. He cogently articulates the obstacles and prejudices Blackwell overcame and sets her within the context of women's history, without neglecting her ambivalence toward the women's rights movement or the fact that she gained admittance to medical school only because a male doctor recommended her. Contemporary photos and prints illustrate this solid biography; a time line and brief bibliography cap it. John Peters


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