Cover image for Lost lives : the stories of the men, women, and children who died as a result of the Northern Ireland troubles
Title:
Lost lives : the stories of the men, women, and children who died as a result of the Northern Ireland troubles
Author:
McKittrick, David, 1949-
Publication Information:
Edinburgh : Mainstream, 2000.

©1999
Physical Description:
1630 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781840182279
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DA990.U452 A15 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This volume is filled with passion and violence, with humanity and inhumanity. It is the story of the Northern Ireland troubles; it is not concerned with political bickering but with the lives of those who have suffered and the deaths which have resulted from more than three decades of conflict.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

McKittrick (Through the Minefield, LJ 2/15/00) and his coauthors are all experienced journalists of the North Ireland beat. This book is a 1600-page obituary, cataloging each life lost during "the Troubles," a huge undertaking whose results have garnered accolades in the U.K. and Ireland. The 3,638 deaths from 1966 to 2000 are chronologically numbered and indexed. Each entry includes the name, number, date of death, county of habitation, marital status, age, religion, occupation, and where appropriate affiliation (IRA, UVF, UDF, British Army, etc.). Assembled from official casualty lists, newspaper accounts, secondary sources, conversations, privately published pamphlets, and the authors' own notes, entries range from a few lines to virtual chapters. West Belfast is the deadliest neighborhood, and the IRA is responsible for almost half the deaths, though a sizable minority of the victims dies from their own blunders, e.g., premature bomb detonation. Like the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, this book tallies the human cost of "the Troubles" in one place. To say that the book is sad or numbing would be an understatement. It belongs in every public and academic library.-Robert C. Moore, Raytheon, Sudbury, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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