Cover image for The immoralist
Title:
The immoralist
Author:
Gide, André, 1869-1951.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Immoraliste. English
Edition:
First Vintage International edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Vintage International, 1996.

©1970
Physical Description:
xiv, 171 pages ; 21 cm
Summary:
"The frail, scholarly Michel ... nearly dies of tuberculosis. He recovers ... what ensues is a wild flight into the realm of the senses that culminate in a remote outpost in the Sahara-- where Michel's hunger for new experiences at any cost bears lethal consequences"--P. [4] of cover.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780679741916
Format :
Book

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Clarence Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

First published in 1902 and immediately assailed for its themes of omnisexual abandon and perverse aestheticism, The Immoralist is the novel that launched Andr#65533; Gide's reputation as one of France's most audacious literary stylists, a groundbreaking work that opens the door onto a universe of unfettered impulse whose possibilities still seem exhilarating and shocking.

Gide's protagonist is the frail, scholarly Michel, who, shortly after his wedding, nearly dies of tuberculosis. He recovers only through the ministrations of his wife, Marceline, and his sudden, ruthless determination to live a life unencumbered by God or values. What ensues is a wild flight into the realm of the senses that culminates in a remote outpost in the Sahara--where Michel's hunger for new experiences at any cost bears lethal consequences. The Immoralist is a book with the power of an erotic fever dream--lush, prophetic, and eerily seductive.


Author Notes

Gide, the reflective rebel against bourgeois morality and one of the most important and controversial figures in modern European literature, published his first book anonymously at the age of 18. Gide was born in Paris, the only child of a law professor and a strict Calvinist mother. As a young man, he was an ardent member of the symbolist group, but the style of his later work is more in the tradition of classicism. Much of his work is autobiographical, and the story of his youth and early adult years and the discovery of his own sexual tendencies is related in Si le grain ne meurt (If it die . . .) (1926). Corydon (1923) deals with the question of homosexuality openly. Gide's reflections on life and literature are contained in his Journals (1954), which span the years 1889--1949.

He was a founder of the influential Nouvelle Revue Francaise, in which the works of many prominent modern European authors appeared, and he remained a director until 1941. He resigned when the journal passed into the hands of the collaborationists. Gide's sympathies with communism prompted him to travel to Russia, where he found the realities of Soviet life less attractive than he had imagined. His accounts of his disillusionment were published as Return from the U.S.S.R. (1937) and Afterthoughts from the U.S.S.R. (1938). Always preoccupied with freedom, a champion of the oppressed and a skeptic, he remained an incredibly youthful spirit.

Gide himself classified his fiction into three categories: satirical tales with elements of farce like Les Caves du Vatican (Lafcadio's Adventures) (1914), which he termed soties; ironic stories narrated in the first person like The Immoralist (1902) and Strait Is the Gate (1909), which he called recits; and a more complex narrative related from a multifaceted point of view, which he called a roman (novel). The only example of the last category that he published was The Counterfeiters (1926).

Throughout his career, Gide maintained an extensive correspondence with such noted figures as Valery, Claudel, Rilke, and others. In 1947, he received the Nobel Prize for Literature.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Table of Contents

Introductionp. vii
Map of Places Mentionedp. x
The Immoralist / L'Immoralistep. 1
Preface / Prefacep. 4
A Monsieur D. R. / To Mr. D. R.p. 8
Partie 1/Part 1

p. 14

Partie 2/Part 2

p. 78

Partie 3/Part 3

p. 156

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