Cover image for Snapshots : 20th century mother-daughter fiction
Title:
Snapshots : 20th century mother-daughter fiction
Author:
Oates, Joyce Carol, 1938-
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : David R. Godine, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xiv, 241 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Wicked girl / Isabel Allende -- Consuelo's letter / Julia Alvarez -- Significant moments in the life of my mother / Margaret Atwood -- The allies / Katherine Dunn -- Cleaning up / Mary Gordon -- La Lloradora / Lois Gould -- An ordinary woman / Bette Greene -- Girl / Jamaica Kincaid -- Solitude / Ursula K. Le Guin -- How to talk to your mother (notes) -- Kiswana Browne / Gloria Naylor -- A rose in the heart of New York / Edna O'Brien -- Mousetrap / Jane Shapiro -- Up above Diamond City / Martha Soukup -- Everyday use / Alice Walker -- Death Mother / Joyce Carol Oates -- Everything old is new again / Janet Berliner.
Reading Level:
1020 Lexile.
ISBN:
9781567921144

9781567921724
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS648.M59 S63 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library PS648.M59 S63 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Author Notes

Joyce Carol Oates was born on June 16, 1938 in Lockport, New York. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Syracuse University and a master's degree in English from the University of Wisconsin.

She is the author of numerous novels and collections of short stories. Her works include We Were the Mulvaneys, Blonde, Bellefleur, You Must Remember This, Because It Is Bitter, Because It Is My Heart, Solstice, Marya : A Life, and Give Me Your Heart. She has received numerous awards including the National Book Award for Them, the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, and the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Lifetime Achievement in American Literature. She was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with her title Lovely, Dark, Deep. She also wrote a series of suspense novels under the pseudonym Rosamond Smith. In 2015, her novel The Accursed became listed as a bestseller on the iBooks chart.

She worked as a professor of English at the University of Windsor, before becoming the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Princeton University. She and her late husband Raymond J. Smith operated a small press and published a literary magazine, The Ontario Review.

(Bowker Author Biography) Joyce Carol Oates is one of the most eminent and prolific literary figures and social critics of our times. She has won the National Book Award and several O. Henry and Pushcart prizes. Among her other awards are an NEA grant, a Guggenheim fellowship, the PEN/Malamud Lifetime Achievement Award, and the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Lifetime Achievement in American Literature.

(Publisher Provided)


Joyce Carol Oates was born on June 16, 1938 in Lockport, New York. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Syracuse University and a master's degree in English from the University of Wisconsin.

She is the author of numerous novels and collections of short stories. Her works include We Were the Mulvaneys, Blonde, Bellefleur, You Must Remember This, Because It Is Bitter, Because It Is My Heart, Solstice, Marya : A Life, and Give Me Your Heart. She has received numerous awards including the National Book Award for Them, the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, and the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Lifetime Achievement in American Literature. She was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with her title Lovely, Dark, Deep. She also wrote a series of suspense novels under the pseudonym Rosamond Smith. In 2015, her novel The Accursed became listed as a bestseller on the iBooks chart.

She worked as a professor of English at the University of Windsor, before becoming the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Princeton University. She and her late husband Raymond J. Smith operated a small press and published a literary magazine, The Ontario Review.

(Bowker Author Biography) Joyce Carol Oates is one of the most eminent and prolific literary figures and social critics of our times. She has won the National Book Award and several O. Henry and Pushcart prizes. Among her other awards are an NEA grant, a Guggenheim fellowship, the PEN/Malamud Lifetime Achievement Award, and the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Lifetime Achievement in American Literature.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Where short fiction circulates, this meaty collection of stories by women about mothers and motherhood should find readers. Oates and Berliner supply, respectively, a brief foreword and an introduction that sketches their editorial process and links between the stories they've gathered. The contributors include both familiar names and more obscure ones: Isabel Allende, Julia Alvarez, Margaret Atwood, Katherine Dunn, Mary Gordon, Lois Gould, Bette Greene, Jamaica Kincaid, Ursula K. LeGuin, Lorrie Moore, Gloria Naylor, Edna O'Brien, Jane Shapiro, Martha Soukup, Alice Walker, and the editors. The tales collected here cover the range of emotion and ambivalence women experience about their mothers; they consider coming of age and the coming of death, dream worlds and gritty reality, presence and absence, isolating distance and overwhelming intimacy. Kincaid's "Girl" takes up not quite two pages, while Gould's "La Lloradora" (excerpted from La Presidenta) and LeGuin's "Solitude" run more than two dozen, yet each (and all the others) supply that intensity of vision readers seek from quality short fiction. --Mary Carroll


Publisher's Weekly Review

Portraits of mothers as nurturing and needy, supportive and critical, sources of humor and wisdom, who, according to Oates's foreword, inspire in their daughters "continual, frustrating speculation," give this collection "an extraordinary range and depth of what the term mother can mean," says South African writer Berliner in her introduction. The editors have gathered 17 stories or excerpts by leading women writers, and by some who are less well known. Some pieces are familiar, like Isabel Allende's lush, evocative "Wicked Girl," where 11-year-old Elena Mejias's sexual awakening is aroused by her mother's attractive boarder. While many selections have been culled from other works, it's satisfying to read a little-known gem from a well-known writer, like Margaret Atwood, whose "Significant Moments in the Life of My Mother" comes from her 1983 novel Bluebeard's Egg. Oates extracts from a recent novel typically spare, disturbing prose describing a suicidal mother picking up her daughter at school. Ursula Le Guin's vision of motherhood in the future, "Solitude," is juxtaposed thematically with Lorrie Moore's reverse chronology in "How to Talk to Your Mother." Jamaica Kincaid, Edna O'Brien, Julia Alvarez, Gloria Naylor and Alice Walker also contribute their unique visions. Equally satisfying selections represent less prominent writers like Jane Shapiro, Katherine Dunn, Martha Soukup, Bette Greene and editor Berliner. Madness, murder, love and guilt are among the topics explored in stories that reveal not just the complex relationships between women and between generations, but also the intelligence and ingenuity of some of today's best writers of short fiction. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Where short fiction circulates, this meaty collection of stories by women about mothers and motherhood should find readers. Oates and Berliner supply, respectively, a brief foreword and an introduction that sketches their editorial process and links between the stories they've gathered. The contributors include both familiar names and more obscure ones: Isabel Allende, Julia Alvarez, Margaret Atwood, Katherine Dunn, Mary Gordon, Lois Gould, Bette Greene, Jamaica Kincaid, Ursula K. LeGuin, Lorrie Moore, Gloria Naylor, Edna O'Brien, Jane Shapiro, Martha Soukup, Alice Walker, and the editors. The tales collected here cover the range of emotion and ambivalence women experience about their mothers; they consider coming of age and the coming of death, dream worlds and gritty reality, presence and absence, isolating distance and overwhelming intimacy. Kincaid's "Girl" takes up not quite two pages, while Gould's "La Lloradora" (excerpted from La Presidenta) and LeGuin's "Solitude" run more than two dozen, yet each (and all the others) supply that intensity of vision readers seek from quality short fiction. --Mary Carroll


Publisher's Weekly Review

Portraits of mothers as nurturing and needy, supportive and critical, sources of humor and wisdom, who, according to Oates's foreword, inspire in their daughters "continual, frustrating speculation," give this collection "an extraordinary range and depth of what the term mother can mean," says South African writer Berliner in her introduction. The editors have gathered 17 stories or excerpts by leading women writers, and by some who are less well known. Some pieces are familiar, like Isabel Allende's lush, evocative "Wicked Girl," where 11-year-old Elena Mejias's sexual awakening is aroused by her mother's attractive boarder. While many selections have been culled from other works, it's satisfying to read a little-known gem from a well-known writer, like Margaret Atwood, whose "Significant Moments in the Life of My Mother" comes from her 1983 novel Bluebeard's Egg. Oates extracts from a recent novel typically spare, disturbing prose describing a suicidal mother picking up her daughter at school. Ursula Le Guin's vision of motherhood in the future, "Solitude," is juxtaposed thematically with Lorrie Moore's reverse chronology in "How to Talk to Your Mother." Jamaica Kincaid, Edna O'Brien, Julia Alvarez, Gloria Naylor and Alice Walker also contribute their unique visions. Equally satisfying selections represent less prominent writers like Jane Shapiro, Katherine Dunn, Martha Soukup, Bette Greene and editor Berliner. Madness, murder, love and guilt are among the topics explored in stories that reveal not just the complex relationships between women and between generations, but also the intelligence and ingenuity of some of today's best writers of short fiction. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Table of Contents

Forewordp. VII
Introductionp. IX
Wicked Girlp. 3
Consuelo's Letterp. 14
Significant Moments in the Life of My Motherp. 24
The Alliesp. 39
Cleaning Upp. 49
La Lloradorap. 65
An Ordinary Womanp. 90
Girlp. 95
Solitudep. 97
How to Talk to Your Mother (notes)p. 125
Kiswana Brownep. 134
A Rose in the Heart of New Yorkp. 146
Mousetrapp. 174
Up Above Diamond Cityp. 185
Eveyday Usep. 195
Death Motherp. 204
Everything Old is New Againp. 228
Contributors' Notesp. 235
Copyright Acknowledgmentsp. 241
Forewordp. VII
Introductionp. IX
Wicked Girlp. 3
Consuelo's Letterp. 14
Significant Moments in the Life of My Motherp. 24
The Alliesp. 39
Cleaning Upp. 49
La Lloradorap. 65
An Ordinary Womanp. 90
Girlp. 95
Solitudep. 97
How to Talk to Your Mother (notes)p. 125
Kiswana Brownep. 134
A Rose in the Heart of New Yorkp. 146
Mousetrapp. 174
Up Above Diamond Cityp. 185
Eveyday Usep. 195
Death Motherp. 204
Everything Old is New Againp. 228
Contributors' Notesp. 235
Copyright Acknowledgmentsp. 241

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