Cover image for Mailbox magic
Title:
Mailbox magic
Author:
Poydar, Nancy.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 2000.
Physical Description:
30 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
A young boy who wants to receive mail of his own sends away for an offer he sees on the back of a cereal box.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 42114.
ISBN:
9780823415250
Format :
Book

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Clearfield Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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East Aurora Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

A young boy who wants to receive mail of his own sends away for an offer he sees on the back of a cereal box.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-7. Will loves waiting for the mail, but nothing ever comes for him. He even writes himself a note, and though it's delivered, it's not the same as getting a real letter. An offer on a cereal box gets his attention: if he eats three boxes of cereal and mails away the box tops, he will get a bowl with his name on it. There are several funny spreads in which Will tries to make sure that three boxes of cereal get eaten as quickly as possible, but the real thrill is when his bowl finally arrives. Poydar captures all the anticipation of waiting for something special (or in Will's case, almost anything) to come in the mail. The Popsicle-colored artwork, full of life, fills up the pages, with Poydar smartly mixing paint with touches of collage to give the pictures texture. The last page offers "mailbox know-how" so that kids will be able to make some mailbox magic of their own. --Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Will, who poses as a magician in flowing cape, thinks the whole concept of mail is magical, and he wishes desperately that something would come addressed to him. Finally he sends away for a personalized cereal bowl by filling out labels from Magic Charms cereal boxes. After weeks of waiting, the child is elated when his package finally arrives. Then he is off to find a cereal company that sends horses. A short sketch of how to send a letter may inspire young children to try their own "mailbox magic." Buoyant, colorful illustrations carry out the exuberance of the story.-Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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