Cover image for Toys! : amazing stories behind some great inventions
Title:
Toys! : amazing stories behind some great inventions
Author:
Wulffson, Don L.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : H. Holt, 2000.
Physical Description:
137 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Describes the creation of a variety of toys and games, from seesaws to Silly Putty and toy soldiers to Trivial Pursuit.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
920 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.8 3.0 40671.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.9 7 Quiz: 25781 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780805061963
Format :
Book

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Central Library GV1218.5 .W85 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Boston Free Library GV1218.5 .W85 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

A fresh, intriguing look at the stories behind great toy inventions.

"Originally, Play-Doh only came in white. There's a good reason for this. You see, Play-Doh didn't start out as a toy. It started out as a product for cleaning wallpaper."

Have you ever wondered who invented Lego, Mr. Potato Head, or toy trains? Here are the fascinating stories behind these toy inventions and many others. Learn why the see-saw was popular with the Romans, how the Slinky was used during the Vietnam War, and the reason Raggedy Ann has a red heart on her chest that says "I love you." From dolls and checkers to pinball and the modern video game, there's a wide selection here for boys and girls alike.

With humor and wit, this intriguing book serves up slices of cultural history that will inspire young readers to start thinking up their own toy inventions.


Author Notes

Don Wulffson is the author of many books for young readers including The Kid Who Invented the Popsicle and Other Strange Inventions . A teacher of English and creative writing, Mr. Wulffson is the recipient of the Leather Medal Award for Poetry. He lives with his family in Northridge, California.

Laurie Keller is the acclaimed author-illustrator of Do Unto Otters, Arnie, the Doughnut, The Scrambled States of America , and Open Wide: Tooth School Inside , among numerous other books for children. She earned a B.F.A. at Kendall College of Art and Design. She lives in Michigan, in a little cottage in the woods on the shore of Lake Michigan.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. It's hard to say whether adults or kids will get a bigger kick out of Wulffson's intriguing histories of favorite toys and games. A glance at the table of contents will send readers scampering in a dozen directions to discover the origins of "Baby Boomer" favorites such as Mr. Potato Head, Slinky, and Silly Putty; really old favorites such as kites, checkers, and Parcheesi; instant classics, including super balls, Play-Doh, and Twister; and evolving classics such as card games, toy soldiers, and arcade games. Each of the 25 chapters is illustrated with small, humorous drawings and discusses a particular toy or game's origin and development. The book ends with a bibliography and a list of Web sites. Good, readable fare for browsing or light research. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-Wulffson shares the stories behind classic and commercial toy inventions such as Legos, Mr. Potato Head, Raggedy Ann, toy soldiers, Twister, checkers, and remote control cars. Readers will discover that some of the most popular creations were the products of experiments gone awry, thus providing a lesson in persistence, surprise outcomes, and creative thinking. Several pages of history are provided for each plaything, followed by bulleted trivia, such as "The ingredient that gives Play-Doh its distinctive aroma is vanilla." Keller's clever black-and-white cartoons add humor to the already-engaging text. A light read or a lively report source on inventions.-Victoria Kidd, Gwinnett County Public Library, Lawrenceville, GA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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