Cover image for The ant and the grasshopper
Title:
The ant and the grasshopper
Author:
Lowry, Amy.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 2000.
Physical Description:
29 unnumbered pages ; 27 cm
Summary:
Retells the fable about a colony of industrious ants which busily prepares for the approaching winter while a grasshopper makes no plans for the cold weather to come.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 670 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.6 0.5 42035.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780823414772
Format :
Book

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Central Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Angola Public Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Grand Island Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lackawanna Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Orchard Park Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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East Delavan Branch Library PZ8.2.P545 AN 2000 Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Industrious ants prepare for winter while a grasshopper doesn't.


Author Notes

Though many modern scholars dispute his existence, Aesop's life was chronicled by first century Greek historians who wrote that Aesop, or Aethiop, was born into Greek slavery in 620 B.C. Freed because of his wit and wisdom, Aesop supposedly traveled throughout Greece and was employed at various times by the governments of Athens and Corinth.

Some of Aesop's most recognized fables are The Tortoise and the Hare, The Fox and the Grapes, and The Ant and the Grasshopper. His simple but effective morals are widely used and illustrated for children. (Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-6. Aesop's fable is transported to the Chinese Emperor's summer palace, and it is an effective move. Most versions of this fable fail to go beyond the basic message, but Poole's paintings and simple text capture the wistful nature of this story, evoking the lazy days and magical nights of summer. The ants here may be thinking in the long term, but they are so busy working that they fail to see the beauty around them; the grasshopper may be doomed but appreciates the summer more than the busy ants. Poole uses ink and gouache on rice paper in double-page spreads to capture the style, subtle colors, and mistiness of traditional Chinese paintings. Yet her pictures aren't merely imitative--they're heightened with an added layer of Western energy. And, although simple, many of the illustrations feature surprising details, such as the animals outlined in the subterranean reaches of the ants' chambers. A wonderfully refreshing spin on the familiar fable. --Todd Morning


Publisher's Weekly Review

This smooth retelling of Aesop's classic fable is set in the summer palace of the Chinese emperor. Poole (How the Rooster Got His Crown) once again applies the techniques of scroll-making to luxurious effect. In calming hues of orange, brown and green, her paintings depict the carefree grasshopper strumming away on his little violin-like instrument while the industrious ants spend the summer preparing for the long, cold winter. In the background, as the royal family holds its festivities, one boy silently tunes in while the grasshopper tries in vain to distract the ants from their tasks: "`Silly ants,' said the grasshopper. `Don't you ever rest? Today is the harvest festival. Come and dance with me.'" The ants resolutely refuse to alter their course and advise the grasshopper to follow their example, which he declines to do. As winter approaches, both the ants and the royal family depart from their summer homes, leaving the grasshopper alone and regretful, a poignant end to a well-retold tale. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Aesop's brief account of the exchange between a feckless grasshopper and an industrious family of ants has been lengthened into a picture-book narrative set in the old summer palace near China's capital. This building makes an ideal backdrop for a tale contrasting the ants' foresight with the grasshopper's quest for instant gratification. Clear, direct prose and evocative art in a contemporary Chinese idiom show the ants preparing for winter, while the grasshopper sings and dances for the emperor as if summer would last forever. When winter comes, and the ruler leaves, the grasshopper is left alone, cold, and hungry, "wishing he had heeded the ant's advice." Bold, well-composed illustrations are painted with a traditional Chinese brush, using ink and gouache on rice paper. Rich rusts, greens, and blues depict the small ants, the large grasshopper, and selected inhabitants of the palace. Poole's ample note outlines the palace's history and describes the fable's source and her own illustrative technique. Making an old story dramatic and particular, this handsome offering is well worth adding to any collection.-Margaret A. Chang, Massachusetts (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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