Cover image for If it ain't got that swing : the rebirth of grown-up culture
Title:
If it ain't got that swing : the rebirth of grown-up culture
Author:
Judge, Mark Gauvreau, 1964-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Dallas : Spence Pub., [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xii, 122 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781890626242
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E169.12 .J83 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In a world dominated by teenagers, it's easy to forget that popular culture once catered to adults. Mark Judge shows that the simultaneous rise of rock and suburbia produced a narcissistic society drained of joy and hope. Yet in the revival of swing dancing, he detects a model for cultural renewal.
-- What can Duke Ellington teach us about life?
-- Why are suburbs pits of despair?
-- How is rock 'n' roll conformist?


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Judge, a contributing writer to the New York Press, devotes this slim volume to his transition from a leftist liberal to a radical, right-wing, swing-dancing polemicist. He identifies the two blinding lights of his conversion experience as reading Christopher Lasch's The Culture of Narcissism and his first swing dance. Through these encounters, he explains, he realized the emptiness of the current promiscuous rock'n'roll culture and wistfully looks for a return to a Leave It to Beaver America. In these meandering pages, Judge counterpoises the male chivalry of the swing dance revival with Bill Clinton's philandering, which he uses to condemn the hypocrisy of liberalism and the bankruptcy of a feminism that encourages disrespect. He also overstates the importance of swing to the emergence of rock'n'roll and bludgeons the reader with Elvis Presley's much-documented connection to the church. Displaying little knowledge or understanding of past or current American culture, Judge presents a sophomoric, opinionated diatribe that offers little to any reader.DDave Szatmary, Univ. of Washington, Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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