Cover image for The impressionists at Argenteuil
Title:
The impressionists at Argenteuil
Author:
Tucker, Paul Hayes, 1950-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, [D.C.] : National Gallery of Art ; Hartford, [Conn.] : Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
179 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 30 cm
General Note:
Organized by the the National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 28-Aug. 20, 2000 and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Sept. 6-Dec. 3, 2000.

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780894682490

9780300083491
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ND551.A74 T83 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

In the 1870s, Argenteuil, located on the outskirts of Paris, was still unmarred by urban industrialization. This book explores the responses to Argenteuil of six influential painters in more than 50 of their works. Catalogue for an upcoming exhibition at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. 105 illustrations, 70 in color.


Summary

A small, unspoiled town on the outskirts of Paris, Argenteuil became a hub of artistic activity during one of the most exciting periods in art history - the decade of the 1870s, when true impressionism was born. Drawn to Argenteuil in search of new inspiration, Claude Monet settled there in 1871. The beauty of the town and its proximity to Paris, along with the amiable presence of Monet himself, soon attracted other artists, who found there the inspiration to create some of the most lyrical, dazzling, and progressive paintings of the day. This richly illustrated book explores the responses of six influential painters to Argenteuil in more than fifty of their works. With scenic vistas still unmarred by urban industrialisation, Argenteuil in the 1870s was ideally suited to the experiments in plein-air effects that became the hallmark of classic impressionist works. Paul Hayes Tucker describes the lively artistic exchange that developed among Monet, Eughne Boudin, Gustave Caillebotte, Idouard Manet, Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley as they worked, often side by side, in and around the town. At Argenteuil, Tucker shows, the artists' fascination with atmospheric effects, depictions of


Reviews 2

Choice Review

In the introductory essay of this exhibition catalog, Tucker (Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston), who has written extensively on the movement, argues that the decade of the 1870s, not the 1860s, and Argenteuil, not Paris, was the time and place where impressionism and modernist painting were born. It was then and there that Renoir, Sisley, Manet, Caillebotte, and Monet "created some of the most novel canvases of their careers ... [constituting] one of the most remarkable bodies of work in the history of art." Argenteuil, a mixture of residential suburb, burgeoning industrial park, resort marina, and farmland, was a microcosm of the changes that late-19th-century France was undergoing, offering painters a kaleidoscope of subjects as foils for the intense colorism and fleeing irregularity of their new art. It was during their visits to Monet at Argenteuil that this band of artists forged the sense of communal spirit needed to overcome the resistance of French art institutions and public, resulting in the epoch-making exhibitions of 1874 and thereafter. Tucker convincingly argues his thesis in extensive essays that accompany each of the 50 paintings--all beautifully illustrated. Highly recommended. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. L. R. Matteson; University of Southern California


Choice Review

In the introductory essay of this exhibition catalog, Tucker (Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston), who has written extensively on the movement, argues that the decade of the 1870s, not the 1860s, and Argenteuil, not Paris, was the time and place where impressionism and modernist painting were born. It was then and there that Renoir, Sisley, Manet, Caillebotte, and Monet "created some of the most novel canvases of their careers ... [constituting] one of the most remarkable bodies of work in the history of art." Argenteuil, a mixture of residential suburb, burgeoning industrial park, resort marina, and farmland, was a microcosm of the changes that late-19th-century France was undergoing, offering painters a kaleidoscope of subjects as foils for the intense colorism and fleeing irregularity of their new art. It was during their visits to Monet at Argenteuil that this band of artists forged the sense of communal spirit needed to overcome the resistance of French art institutions and public, resulting in the epoch-making exhibitions of 1874 and thereafter. Tucker convincingly argues his thesis in extensive essays that accompany each of the 50 paintings--all beautifully illustrated. Highly recommended. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. L. R. Matteson; University of Southern California


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