Cover image for Classic chilling tales. Volume 3
Title:
Classic chilling tales. Volume 3
Author:
Keeble, Jonathan.
Publication Information:
Redhill, Surrey, UK : Naxos Audio Books, [1998]

â„—1998
Physical Description:
2 audio discs (2 hr., 26 min., 22 sec.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
"Five fine ghost stories in the classic 19th century tradition"--Container.

Compact disc.

Classical music accompaniment; discography included.

Notes by David Blake on container.
Language:
English
Contents:
An account of some strange disturbances in Aungier Street / J.S. Le Fanu (36:00) -- That damned thing (20:00) ; The moonlit road (25:00) / Ambrose Bierce -- The upper berth / F. Marion Crawford (35:00) -- To let / B.M. Croker (33:00).
ISBN:
9789626341643
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library XX(1079441.1) V.2 Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

From a fearful beast to a murderous obsession, from the fear of an invisible presence to malevolent magic, these chilling tales written by masters of the genre, contain all manner of disconcerting phenomena that will linger in the mind long after the final word is spoken.


Author Notes

Ambrose Bierce was a brilliant, bitter, and cynical journalist. He is also the author of several collections of ironic epigrams and at least one powerful story, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge."

Bierce was born in Ohio, where he had an unhappy childhood. He served in the Union army during the Civil War. Following the war, he moved to San Francisco, where he worked as a columnist for the newspaper the Examiner, for which he wrote a number of satirical sketches.

Bierce wrote a number of horror stories, some poetry, and countless essays. He is best known, however, for The Cynic's Word Book (1906), retitled The Devil's Dictionary in 1911, a collection of such cynical definitions as "Marriage: the state or condition of a community consisting of a master, a mistress, and two slaves, making in all, two." Bierce's own marriage ended in divorce, and his life ended mysteriously. In 1913, he went to Mexico and vanished, presumably killed in the Mexican revolution.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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