Cover image for Good schools/real schools : why school reform doesn't last
Title:
Good schools/real schools : why school reform doesn't last
Author:
Fink, Dean, 1936-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Teachers College Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvii, 192 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Corporate Subject:
ISBN:
9780807739457

9780807739440
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library LB2822.84.C2 F56 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Literature on school reform tends to concentrate on the initiation and implementation of reform. This work seeks to provide change agents, policy makers, and students of educational change with advice on the sustaining of change and the scaling up of change to more systemic reform.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Fink (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education) describes the life cycle of an innovative Canadian secondary school. "From its creative and experimental origins [in the early 1970s, the school] evolved through a phase of overreaching and entropy to a third stage of survival and continuity." The volume, based on his doctoral dissertation, is a combination of retrospective interviews with a sample of the school's staff and Fink's own observations as an original department head in the school and as a continuing associate of the school. Fink offers a detailed history of the school and examines this history through six "lenses": context, meaning, leadership, structure, culture, and teachers' lives and work. He concludes that there is a "ælife cycle' to new and innovative schools that leads to the attrition of change." At this school, as at so many others, a dynamic and strong leader left after a few years, and a host of factors, many outside the control of the school community, gradually influenced school life to make it little different from other secondary schools. The book provides one detailed example of this tendency noted by many writers and recognized by all who struggle for "school reform." Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and professionals. G. E. Hein emeritus, Lesley College


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