Cover image for The snake and the fox : an introduction to logic
Title:
The snake and the fox : an introduction to logic
Author:
Haight, M. R. (Mary Rowland)
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Routledge, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xi, 495 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780415166935

9780415166942
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BC108 .H18 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The Snake and the Fox is a highly imaginative and fun way to learn logic. Mary Haight's characters guide you through an elaborate tale of how logic works. This book features the Snake and the Fox, Granny, Gussie and the Newts, Ren^De Descartes and Miss Nightingale, along with a huge supporting cast of humans, devils and sausage machines.
For anyone coming to logic for the first time, this is the best place to start. Mary Haight makes logic easy and fun - she asks the reader questions, and uses words instead of logic symbols with amusing pictures and characters to help them.
This book teaches all the basics the reader needs to know about logic (how arguments work, sound, valid reasoning, truth tables, Venn diagrams etc) in a truly enjoyable and innovative way. Anyone teaching themselves logic, or learning it on a course is bound to benefit from this original and intriguing book.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

The Snake and the Fox is clear, engaging, and carefully presented. Using graphics, Haight explains how logic works, and why it works as it does. She covers the topics of truth and validity, the logic of statements (truth tables), the logic of sets (Venn diagrams), and the logic of statements (proofs). Haight offers some discussion of the philosophy underlying logic, not just how it is done but why it takes the form it does. Each chapter is developed with a series of instructive examples, and the student will be pleased to find complete solutions to all exercises in the text. No background in logic is assumed. The clear, clean presentation would make this a good choice for the novice. Undergraduates. R. L. Pour; Emory and Henry College


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