Cover image for American modernism
Title:
American modernism
Author:
Barbour, Scott, 1963-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
208 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Defining American Modernism -- The new poetry -- American writers of the 1920s and 1930s -- Regional movements: Renaissance in Harlem and the South -- Evaluating American Modernists and their contribution.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780737702019

9780737702002
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS228.M63 A49 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

An overview of the literature of American Modernism.


Summary

An overview of the literature of American Modernism.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-This well-written introduction explains what modernism is and addresses such topics as "The New Poetry" and "Regional Movements." Each section contains 2-to-5 annotated scholarly essays, some excerpted, ranging in length from 4-to-14 pages that examine a specific aspect of the literature. All of them open with a few summarizing comments and/or background on the author(s). Within the essays, the works of specific writers are introduced in the hope that readers get a complete "picture of the complex interplay of social, economic, political, aesthetic, and philosophical forces and ideas" that contribute to the development of any era. While the book contains some literary jargon, students will find it a helpful companion to other sources. A chronology lists authors and their works. Students doing research will appreciate the four-page topical bibliography and detailed index. A valuable resource.-Linda Zoppa, South Bronx High School, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-This well-written introduction explains what modernism is and addresses such topics as "The New Poetry" and "Regional Movements." Each section contains 2-to-5 annotated scholarly essays, some excerpted, ranging in length from 4-to-14 pages that examine a specific aspect of the literature. All of them open with a few summarizing comments and/or background on the author(s). Within the essays, the works of specific writers are introduced in the hope that readers get a complete "picture of the complex interplay of social, economic, political, aesthetic, and philosophical forces and ideas" that contribute to the development of any era. While the book contains some literary jargon, students will find it a helpful companion to other sources. A chronology lists authors and their works. Students doing research will appreciate the four-page topical bibliography and detailed index. A valuable resource.-Linda Zoppa, South Bronx High School, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Irving HoweJulian SymonsFloyd C. WatkinsRichard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson Jr.Louise BoganRichard GrayDavid PerkinsBabette DeutschMalcolm CowleyDonald PizerMalcolm BradburyAlfred KazinFrederick J. HoffmanAmritjit SinghAlexander KaranikasMalcolm CowleyMarcus KleinHouston A. Baker Jr.Ernest EarnestC. Barry ChabotIrving HoweJulian SymonsFloyd C. WatkinsRichard Ellmann and Charles Feidelson Jr.Louise BoganRichard GrayDavid PerkinsBabette DeutschMalcolm CowleyDonald PizerMalcolm BradburyAlfred KazinFrederick J. HoffmanAmritjit SinghAlexander KaranikasMalcolm CowleyMarcus KleinHouston A. Baker Jr.Ernest EarnestC. Barry Chabot
Forewordp. 9
Introductionp. 11
A History and Overview of American Modernismp. 13
Chapter 1 Defining American Modernism
1. The Characteristics of Modernismp. 28
2. American Modernism Is Distinct from European Modernismp. 36
3. The Use of Concrete Words and Images in American Modernismp. 44
4. Modernism Expresses Both Historical Discontinuity and a Sense of Traditionp. 51
Chapter 2 The New Poetry
1. The American Poetic Renaissance: New Freedoms in Subject and Formp. 56
2. The Tenets of Imagism: Directness, Conciseness, and Musical Rhythmp. 64
3. T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land: The Chief Example of Modernist Poetryp. 72
4. The Influence of World War I on American Modernist Poetryp. 82
Chapter 3 American Writers of the 1920s and 1930s
1. The Lost Generation: Writers in a Time of Transitionp. 91
2. The American Expatriates Fled a Repressive Societyp. 98
3. F. Scott Fitzgerald Captured the Spirit of His Generationp. 104
4. Ernest Hemingway Used a Precise Style to Depict the Individual in Crisisp. 112
5. The Stream-of-Consciousness Technique in American Modernist Fictionp. 120
Chapter 4 Regional Movements: Renaissance in Harlem and the South
1. The Harlem Renaissance: A Florescence of Creativityp. 127
2. The Fugitives, the Agrarians, and the Southern Renaissancep. 141
Chapter 5 Evaluating American Modernists and Their Contribution
1. American Modernists Revolted Against Genteel Traditionp. 155
2. American Modernists Were Defenders of Genteel Traditionp. 162
3. Modernism Is an Exclusively White, Western Movementp. 171
4. American Modernists Were Intellectually Shallowp. 178
5. American Modernists Strove to Improve American Societyp. 188
Chronologyp. 194
For Further Researchp. 197
Indexp. 201
Forewordp. 9
Introductionp. 11
A History and Overview of American Modernismp. 13
Chapter 1 Defining American Modernism
1. The Characteristics of Modernismp. 28
2. American Modernism Is Distinct from European Modernismp. 36
3. The Use of Concrete Words and Images in American Modernismp. 44
4. Modernism Expresses Both Historical Discontinuity and a Sense of Traditionp. 51
Chapter 2 The New Poetry
1. The American Poetic Renaissance: New Freedoms in Subject and Formp. 56
2. The Tenets of Imagism: Directness, Conciseness, and Musical Rhythmp. 64
3. T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land: The Chief Example of Modernist Poetryp. 72
4. The Influence of World War I on American Modernist Poetryp. 82
Chapter 3 American Writers of the 1920s and 1930s
1. The Lost Generation: Writers in a Time of Transitionp. 91
2. The American Expatriates Fled a Repressive Societyp. 98
3. F. Scott Fitzgerald Captured the Spirit of His Generationp. 104
4. Ernest Hemingway Used a Precise Style to Depict the Individual in Crisisp. 112
5. The Stream-of-Consciousness Technique in American Modernist Fictionp. 120
Chapter 4 Regional Movements: Renaissance in Harlem and the South
1. The Harlem Renaissance: A Florescence of Creativityp. 127
2. The Fugitives, the Agrarians, and the Southern Renaissancep. 141
Chapter 5 Evaluating American Modernists and Their Contribution
1. American Modernists Revolted Against Genteel Traditionp. 155
2. American Modernists Were Defenders of Genteel Traditionp. 162
3. Modernism Is an Exclusively White, Western Movementp. 171
4. American Modernists Were Intellectually Shallowp. 178
5. American Modernists Strove to Improve American Societyp. 188
Chronologyp. 194
For Further Researchp. 197
Indexp. 201

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