Cover image for Moses goes to school
Title:
Moses goes to school
Author:
Millman, Isaac.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Frances Foster Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Moses and his friends enjoy the first day of school at their special school for the deaf and hard of hearing, where they use sign language to talk to each other.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 460 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 45225.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.7 2 Quiz: 29738 Guided reading level: K.
ISBN:
9780374350697
Format :
Book

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Clearfield Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

A day at a school for the deaf is like a day at any school

Moses goes to a special school, a public school for the deaf. He and all of his classmates are deaf or hard-of-hearing, but that doesn't mean they don't have a lot to say to each other! They communicate in American Sign Language (ASL), using visual signs and facial expressions. Isaac Millman follows Moses through a school day, telling the story in pictures and written English, and in ASL, introducing hearing children to the signs for some of the key words and ideas. At the end is a favorite song -- "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" -- in sign!


Author Notes

Isaac Millmans first book was Moses Goes to a Concert , which Booklist , in a starred review, called a "breakthrough picture book about a deaf child [that] works so well that you wonder why there aren't lots more like it." He lives in New York City with his wife.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-8. As in Moses Goes to a Concert (1998), this joyful picture book tells a story in written English and also in American Sign Language (ASL). This time the focus is directly on how deaf children learn at their special public school--in the classroom, on the playground, and on the school bus. The warm line-and-watercolor illustrations show the diversity of Moses' city classroom, the fun the children have together, and the special way they learn. There are small diagrams of Moses signing simple sentences on almost every page. Millman explains in an introductory note that ASL has its own handshapes, movements, and facial expressions, as well as its own grammar and syntax. Moses types a letter on the computer and learns to translate it into spoken English. The teacher plays "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" on his boom box; the children can feel the vibrations and they sign the words to the song. A must for deaf children, this will also interest hearing kids and adults who want to learn about ASL. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Moses, who debuted in Moses Goes to a Concert (Farrar, 1998), is back. Here, he and his classmates, all of whom are deaf or hard of hearing, head back to their special school after summer break. The text explains that in addition to standard curriculum, these children first learn American Sign Language and then learn to read and write spoken English. Computer technology plays an important role in this class, as does music. Just as in the first book, this story reminds readers that even though these children may not be able to hear in the traditional sense, their appreciation of music and song is very enthusiastic. Child-friendly cartoon illustrations do a marvelous job of emphasizing the normalcy and charm of these youngsters. The variety of ethnicities and nationalities represented again emphasizes that special-needs children come from all cultures. The double-page layouts nicely accommodate the primary pictorial action along with written text and ASL inserts featuring Moses signing a particular sequence from the story. An author's note and directions on how to interpret the child's signing are also included. This is another great contribution to children's education about disabilities that also succeeds as effective storytelling in its own right.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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